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    After the deadly shooting at a Pittsburgh synagogue Saturday, Springfield officials promised resources to keep the local Jewish community safe.

    SPRINGFIELD - As news continues to come in about a deadly shooting at a synagogue in Pittsburgh, Springfield's mayor and police commissioner have promised to add heightened security to local Jewish institutions. 

    Mayor Domenic J. Sarno and Police Commissioner John Barbieri said that they had reached out to area synagogues and Jewish Community Center and will add "heightened police and security procedures and presence" to these places. 

    "Our thoughts and prayers go out to those individuals and affected families. We must stay ever vigilant and proactive to stop and prevent these types of hideous crimes," reads a statement released by the Mayor's office. 

    A man entered a Pittsburgh synagogue where a baby naming ceremony was taking place Saturday and began shooting. He killed an unknown number of people and wounded at least six others. Among the wounded were four police officers. 

    The suspect has been identified as Robert Bowers


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    On the gab social media site, a profile that reportedly belonged to Bowers reads "jews are the children of satan."

    Robert Bowers, the man accused of entering a Pittsburgh synagogue Saturday morning, fatally shooting multiple people, reportedly had a social media site full of anti-Semitic messages.

    On the gab social media site, a profile that reportedly belonged to Bowers reads "jews are the children of satan."

    The profile is no longer available on gab's website, but it has been archived with only some of its content viewable. 

    People were at the Tree of Life Congregation in Pittsburgh's Squirrel Hill neighborhood Saturday morning for a baby naming ceremony when Bowers allegedly went in and started shooting.

    An unknown amount of people were killed and at least six were injured, including four police officers who rushed to the scene.

    The FBI is investigating the incident as a hate crime, officials said. 

    Bower's last post on Gab, published Saturday morning, reads, "HIAS likes to bring invaders in that kill our people. I can't sit by and watch my people get slaughtered. Screw your optics, I'm going in."

    HIAS is an American nonprofit organization that provides humanitarian aid and assistance to refugees.

    Bowers posted about HIAS 17 days ago, writing, "Why hello there HIAS! You like to bring in hostile invaders to dwell among us? We appreciate the list of friends you have provided: hias.org/events/national-refugee-shabbat"

    Wendell Hissrich, the Pittsburgh public safety director, was nearly in tears Saturday afternoon as he addressed the media.

    "It is a very horrific crime scene. It was one of the worst that I've seen. It is very bad," Hissrich said during a press conference.

    Bowers, who is in his 40s, was taken into custody and brought to the hospital for questioning and treatment of injuries. 

    Material from The Associated Press was used in this report.


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    Daylight Saving Time is observed everywhere in the U.S. expect Hawaii, American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands and Arizona, except the Navajo Indian Reservation, which does observe DST.

    I've been hearing a lot of people lately asking, "When do the clocks fall back?"

    Not that they're in a particular rush to see Daylight Saving Time 2018 come to an end, especially considering how much earlier and earlier it's getting dark these afternoons. 

    Fortunately, for those of us who like afternoon daylight, there's another week to go before we return to standard time.

    Daylight Saving Time 2018 ends on Sunday, Nov. 4, at 2 a.m. local time. At that time you should set your clocks and watches back to 1 a.m., if they don't do it themselves. 

    For those who go to sleep before midnight, you'll want to change your clocks next Saturday night, Nov. 3, before turning in.

    Daylight Saving Time is observed everywhere in the U.S. except Hawaii, American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands and Arizona, except the Navajo Indian Reservation, which does observe DST.

    Last year, a Massachusetts commission considering changing the Bay State's time zone recommended keeping Daylight Saving Time year-round, as long as a majoring of Northeastern states also wanted to.

    The Florida Legislature this year overwhelmingly voted to keep Daylight Saving Time year-round and the bill was signed by Gov. Rick Scott. But Florida has to change to standard time with everyone else next weekend because only Congress can OK keeping Daylight Saving Time year-round, and that hasn't happened so far for Florida.

    Californians will vote in November on Proposition 7, which would allow their Legislature to vote to maintain Daylight Saving Time year-round.

    More info:

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Daylight Saving Time rules >>

    U.S. Naval Observatory Daylight Time >>

    timeanddate.com sunrise and sunset calculator >>

    Daylight Saving Time worldwide >>

    Uniform Time Act of 1966 [pdf] >>


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    Firefighters responded to 104 Hemenway St. around 3:15 p.m., the fire department said.

    The Boston Fire Department is battling a six-alarm blaze at a residential building in the city's Back Bay neighborhood.

    Firefighters responded to 104 Hemenway St. around 3:15 p.m., the fire department said. Flames were visible from the five-story building.

    The building was occupied, according to the fire department.

    Fire Chief Joe Finn is at the scene, which is close to Northeastern University. 

    The flames are heavy on the upper floors of the building, the fire department said.

    No injuries have been reported at this time.


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    The man arrested in the mass shooting Saturday at a Pennsylvania synagogue appears to have made virulently anti-Semitic posts on a social media platform popular with far-right extremists.

    WASHINGTON (AP) -- The man arrested in the mass shooting Saturday at a Pennsylvania synagogue appears to have made virulently anti-Semitic posts on a social media platform popular with far-right extremists, including one made shortly before the attack.

    Police have identified the suspect as Robert Bowers, 46, of Pittsburgh. A man with the same name posted on the site Gab.com on the morning of the shooting that "HIAS likes to bring invaders in that kill our people. I can't sit by and watch my people get slaughtered. Screw your optics, I'm going in."

    HIAS is a Maryland-based nonprofit group that helps refugees around the world find safety and freedom. The organization says it is guided by Jewish values and history. President and CEO Mark Hetfield said he wasn't aware of the shooter's "obsession with HIAS until this morning."

    The shooter opened fire at Pittsburgh's Tree of Life Synagogue, killing 11 people and wounding at least six others including four police officers. Bowers was wounded in a shootout with police and was reported to be in custody Saturday at a nearby hospital.

    Pittsburgh synagogue shooting: 11 confirmed dead; suspect in custody

    President Donald Trump characterized the mass shooting as an anti-Semitic attack and law enforcement officials said they were investigating it as a hate crime.

    Bowers has no apparent criminal record. He was registered in Allegheny County, which includes Pittsburgh, as an unaffiliated voter. Heavily armed officers responded to an apartment building in Pittsburgh on Saturday afternoon that may have been associated with Bowers.

    In a statement, Gab.com said it suspended the alleged gunman's account Saturday morning shortly after his name was mentioned on police radio chatter. The company said it backed up the content of the account and notified the FBI.

    Gab has become an alternative to Twitter for users whose racist and harassing online behavior got them banned from the mainstream platform. The company said it disavows acts of terrorism and violence, but sees its mission as defending "free expression and individual liberty online for all people."

    Gab founder and CEO Andrew Torba declined to answer emailed questions posed by an AP reporter. A post made on the site's Twitter account on Saturday appeared to revel in the attention prompted by the killings, saying "We have been getting 1 million hits an hour all day."

    The Associated Press reviewed an archived version of the posts made under Bowers' name. The screen name @onedingo, used on the Gab account, matches email addresses listed for Bowers in online databases that contain the same "onedingo" moniker.

    In the description on his account, Bowers wrote "jews are the children of satan." The cover photo featured the neo-Nazi symbol "1488." The first two numbers refer to the white supremacist "14 Words" slogan, while "88" stands for "Heil Hitler" since "H'' is the eighth letter of the alphabet.

    Among his recent posts, Bowers posted a photo of a fiery oven like those used in Nazi concentration camps used to cremate Jews, writing the caption "Make Ovens 1488F Again." But in other posts he also featured memes containing false conspiracy theories suggesting the Holocaust -- in which an estimated 6 million Jews perished -- was a hoax.

    Who is Pittsburgh synagogue shooting suspect Robert Bowers?

    Another post derided Trump for being "a globalist, not a nationalist" and added that "there is no #MAGA" as long as there is a Jewish "infestation," using a slur for Jews. The same post also referenced QAnon, a pro-Trump conspiracy theory that started on the message board 4chan and has been spread by a fringe element of the president's supporters.

    Bowers also recently posted a photo of a collection of three black semi-automatic handguns he titled "my glock family," a reference to the Austrian firearms manufacturer. He also posted photos of bullet holes in person-sized targets at a firing range, touting the "amazing trigger" on his weapon.

    --By Michael Biesecker, Michael Kunzelman and MICHAEL Balsamo,  Associated Press.


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    President Donald Trump mourned the dead and forcefully condemned anti-Semitism Saturday after a mass shooting at a Pittsburgh synagogue that left 11 dead. Watch video

    MURPHYSBORO, Ill. (AP) -- President Donald Trump mourned the dead and forcefully condemned anti-Semitism Saturday after a mass shooting at a Pittsburgh synagogue that left 11 dead. But faced with another national tragedy, he could not long turn his focus away from the midterm elections or himself.

    Nine days from elections that will determine the control of Congress, Trump stuck to his plans to appear at an agricultural convention and a political rally. Throughout the day, he expressed sorrow, called for justice and bemoaned hate, getting regular updates on the shooting. But he also campaigned for candidates, took shots at favorite Democratic targets House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and Sen. Elizabeth Warren and made jokes about his hair.

    At a massive rally in southern Illinois for U.S. Rep. Mike Bost, Trump condemned the shooting as an "evil anti-Semitic attack." But he said cancelling his appearance would make "sick, demented people important." He pledged to change his tone for the evening and did cool some of his most fiery rhetoric.

    The slaughter at Sabbath services followed a tense week dominated by a mail bomb plot with apparent political motivations and served as another toxic reminder of a divided nation. It also again underscored Trump's reluctance to step into the role of national unifier at tense moments as well as his singular focus heading into elections that could dramatically change his presidency.

    Trump acknowledged the weight these moments carry, telling reporters that experiencing such events as president, "it's a level of terribleness and horror that you can't even believe. It's hard to believe."


    The White House said Trump was getting regular briefings on the attack. He spoke with the governor of Pennsylvania and the mayor of Pittsburgh. He also spoke with his daughter Ivanka Trump and her husband, Jared Kushner, who are Jewish.

    Trump sought to energize turnout for Bost, who is fighting to hold on to a seat that was once a Democratic stronghold, but turned out for Trump in 2016. To bolster his argument for sticking with the rally, Trump argued that the New York Stock Exchange was opened the day after 9/11, though in fact it was re-opened on September 17.

    Speaking to a massive, cheering crowd at an airport hangar in southern Illinois, Trump said "the hearts of all Americans are filled with grief, following the monstrous killing." He told reporters before the rally that he would travel to Pittsburgh, though he did not offer details. He also sought to distance himself from the man arrested in the shooting, calling him "sick" and saying "he was no supporter of mine."

    Although his tone was softer, he still targeted Pelosi and Democrats and the crowd gleefully shouted "lock her up," in reference to Hillary Clinton, one of the targets of the bomb plot. And he continued to emphasize his hardline immigration rhetoric. "Republicans want strong borders, no crime, and no caravans," Trump said.

    Trump's speech to a convention of the Future Farmers of America had all the hallmarks of a Trump rally, as the president riffed on trade, jobs and some of his political enemies. At one point he also joked about his hair. He said it was ruffled by the rain as he left Washington, adding "I said, 'maybe I should cancel this arrangement because I have a bad hair day."

    Trump offered an unsparing denunciation of anti-Semitism, which he said was the motive behind the attack, in contrast to remarks after clashes between white supremacists and counterprotesters in Charlottesville last year. Then, he only inflamed tensions by blaming both sides for the violence.

    Speaking to young farmers in Indianapolis, Trump called on the country to come together, before inviting a pastor and rabbi on stage to pray.

    Earlier in the day, Trump speculated that the death toll in Pittsburgh would have been curbed if an armed guard had been in the building. With both the number of deaths and details of the synagogue's security still to be disclosed, Trump said gun control "has little to do with it" but "if they had protection inside, the results would have been far better."

    But the attack did not persuade him that tighter gun controls are needed.

    "This is a case where, if they had an armed guard inside, they might have been able to stop him immediately," Trump said. "Maybe there would have been nobody killed, except for him, frankly. So it's a very, very - a very difficult situation."

    In previous mass shootings, Trump has at times said he would consider tightening gun laws but in the main has called for more armed guards in places such as schools.

    "The world is a violent world," he said before his speech.  "And you think when you're over it, it just sort of goes away, but then it comes back in the form of a madman, a wacko. ... They had a maniac walk in and they didn't have any protection and that is just so sad to see, so sad to see."

    Trump said lawmakers "should very much bring the death penalty into vogue" and people who kill in places such as synagogues and churches "really should suffer the ultimate price."

    By CATHERINE LUCEY, Associated Press


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    A Kitchen fire forced four children and two adults from their home at 135 Santa Barbara St. Saturday night. Fire officials said the fire started on the stove and caused $25,000 in damage.

    Six people were forced from their home Saturday night when fire gutted the home's kitchen.

    The executive aide to Springfield Fire Commissioner Bernard Calvi, Dennis Leger said the 9:35 p.m. fire at 135 Santa Barbara St., started on the stove and spread to the rest of the room, caused about $25,000 in damage. 

    The two adults and four children living in the home were forced out of the single family, Cape-styled home and will be assisted by the American Red Cross. 

    No injuries were reported in the incident. 


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    Two tickets sold for Saturday's Powerball drawing will claim a share of the $687.8 million jackpot.

    Two tickets sold for Saturday's Powerball drawing will claim a share of the $687.8 million jackpot.

    Lottery officials announced early Sunday that tickets sold in New York state and in Iowa will split the top prize.

    The New York State Lottery announced that one of the jackpot tickets was sold in New York City at West Harlem Deli Corp., 2040 5th Ave.

    There was no immediate word from the Iowa Lottery about the location where its winning jackpot ticket was sold.

    Tickets sold in Florida and Texas won $2 million secondary prizes Saturday, while tickets worth $1 million each were sold in nine other states.

    powerballlogo.jpg

    Here are Saturday's winning numbers:

    08-12-13-19-27, Powerball: 04, PowerPlay: 3X

    The estimated jackpot was $687.8 million. The lump sum payment before taxes would be more than  $400 million. Because there were jackpot winners, the amount resets at $40 million for the next drawing.

    A single winning ticket, sold in New York City and worth $245.6 million, won Aug. 11.

    Powerball is held in 44 states, the District of Columbia, the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico.

    A $2 ticket gives you a one in 292.2 million chance at joining the hall of Powerball champions.

    The drawings are held at 10:59 p.m. Eastern Wednesdays and Saturdays. Deadline to purchase tickets is 9:45 p.m.


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    The church has a storied history of fighting for social justice and was the home congregation of the late Fred Rogers, a humanitarian who starred in the "Mister Rogers' Neighborhood" television program.

    PITTSBURGH - Under a persistent drizzle on Saturday, more than 500 people stood shoulder-to-shoulder during a vigil in front of Sixth Presbyterian Church of Pittsburgh to express shock and anger over the mass shooting at Tree of Life Synagogue around the corner.

    The church has a storied history of fighting for social justice and was the home congregation of the late Fred Rogers, a humanitarian who starred in the "Mister Rogers' Neighborhood" television program.

    The service was designed to show the unity in this city after 11 people were shot and killed at the synagogue during Saturday services. As they weeped and sang religious hymns, the mourners who gathered said the shooting will spur them to greater action in tackling anti-Semitism, assault rifles and fighting poverty.

    "You are seeing all of these people show up from this community, because we care about love," said Jenna Cramer, 37, who lives in Pittsburgh's Point Breeze neighborhood. "This is Mr. Rogers' neighborhood and this is a neighborhood where we serve."

    Throughout the day, as the news sunk in here, Cramer said her friends began sharing one of Rogers's best-known quotes. In times of trouble, Rogers, who died in 2003, used to tell children to "look for the helpers" so they know they are not alone.

    "All of these people here are 'looking for the helpers," Cramer said, "because that is what this neighborhood is about."

    Squirrel Hill, located near Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh, includes both a vibrant commercial strip of clothing stores, coffee shops and bars. It also includes big brick homes where rabbits and squirrels frolic just feet away from traffic-clogged city arteries.

    In addition to more than a half-dozen synagogues, Squirrel is also home to several Protestant and Catholic churches.

    "One of the oldest Jewish neighborhoods in the United States is here, and we value and love our neighbors, and we are not going to allow them to stand alone through this," said the Rev. Vincent Kolb, the pastor at Sixth Presbyterian Church.

    Symone Saul, 33, attended Dor Hadash, one of three congregations that worships at Tree of Life synagogue. As he wandered through the vigil, Saul was asking anyone she could if they had any information on any of the victims.

    Like many people here, Saul assumes she will know least one person who was killed in the shooting. But Saul believes the shooting "will solidify" the community into action.

    "Everyone is aware of all of these occurrences and unfortunate things that have been happening in this country," Saul said. "Jews certainly understand. . . . My congregation was already heavily involved in social justice and I think we see this as more fuel to help other people who are in this same situation, including systematic violence against people of color and immigrants."

    Coming one day after a Florida man was arrested for sending at least 11 explosive devices to prominent Democratic politicians, the vigil at times even took on a distinctly political tone.

    When it concluded, hundreds broke into a spontaneous chant of "vote, vote, vote . . ."

    "We have a president that doesn't understand the dark forces that he has unleashed," said Ed Wolf, 62, who is Jewish and has attended services at Tree of Life synagogue.

    Wolf noted that he's worshiped at numerous synagogues in Europe.

    "I used to marvel at the level of security they have, and I would always leave those places thinking how lucky I am to live in a place where we don't have to think about stuff like that," said Wolf, as he began to cry.

    Beth Venditti, Wolf's wife, said anti-Semitic fliers and some graffiti occasionally appears in the community. But Venditti said Jews "always felt safe here."

    "There has been precious little hate until today," said Venditti, 62.

    She also fears Trump will not be able to rise to the occasion to help stamp out violence and anti-Semitism.

    "We had a president who stood up and sang 'Amazing Grace' after Charleston," said Venditti, referring to President Barack Obama's response after Dylann Roof killed nine worshipers at a church with a predominantly African-American congregation in Charleston, South Carolina, in 2015. "That ain't going to happen now."

    (c) 2018, The Washington Post. Written by Tim Craig


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    Two local developers said they are proud of a completed major renovation to a historic house at 175 Mill St. in Springfield that was tax-foreclosed and on the verge of demolition.

    SPRINGFIELD -- Two local developers called it a labor of love on Friday as residents and city officials viewed the extensive renovation of a historic house at 175 Mill St., that was long vacant, tax-foreclosed and on the verge of demolition.

    Developers Demetrios Panteleakis and Walter Kroll of Icarian Real Estate Advisers said their project was expensive and challenging, but also rewarding and too important to pass up.

    In addition to the main Victorian house, built in 1888, the property includes a carriage house/garage in the rear that was large enough to be converted into two apartments with a basement. The property is located in the Maple High-South End area.

    Kroll said he and Panteleakis are "obviously very proud."

    "We get involved with these because we love them," Kroll said. "There is a lot of satisfaction when you're done because you can actually see the work, you see the character kind of come back to life. We really enjoy this kind of historic preservation."

    The two have tackled other historic preservation projects on Mill Street and other Springfield locations.

    "We're the city of homes," Panteleakis said. "If we don't preserve the real jewels that we have then we are going to be in big trouble. Some you can't. But if it can be done, I would do my best, myself and Walter do our best to do what we can for them."

    Jim Boone of Springfield, a volunteer with the Springfield Preservation Trust, was among the visitors Friday. He said he is "very impressed with the work that they've done here." He had been to the house before the complete renovation, and "questioned its salvageability."

    "They have done a marvelous job in saving what is actually a beautiful house," Boone said. "Anybody that thinks that something can't be saved should come and see houses like this and really appreciate the fact that with good intentions and good hard work you can save them."

    City officials visiting the house included Ward 3 Councilor Melvin Edwards and At-Large Councilors Jesse Lederman and Kateri Walsh. Mayor Domenic J. Sarno also visited the house recently.

    The city took ownership of the building in a tax foreclosure proceeding, and sold it to the developers for $1,000, with the low price offset by an investment estimated at $350,000. The city also aided with the development with a $50,000 federal Community Development Block Grant.

    Panteleakis said there are not a lot of people able to restore historic homes in the city "when they get to a certain level where they require a long period of time and a lot of investment."

    Ramon Ray, a next-door neighbor on Mill Street, said he is excited to see the improvements.

    "I'm glad it's back on the market," Ray said. "I'm glad I have neighbors pretty soon. I'm glad the value of the neighborhood is going back up."

    Edwards, the ward councilor and president of the Maple High-Six Corners Neighborhood Council, said he has watched the renovations from the beginning.

    "This is completely outstanding," Edwards said. "It's such a beautiful project. If you'd seen what it looked like prior to their involvement, to what it is today, this is just a major transformation and I'm very proud to be part of it."

    Lederman said the project is "another great example of some work by really dedicated both city residents and developers." The developers have shown a track record of developing responsibly and with an eye toward historic preservation, he said.

    Walsh said the restoration of the house is "very exciting."

    "To see the work that has gone into it, the attention to detail, the feeling you get when you come in," Walsh said. "I congratulate them on all the work that they've done and I'm really happy to see this property go back on the tax rolls."

    In addition to extensive renovations, there are all new systems installed including electrical, heating and plumbing, brought fully up to modern codes, the developers said.

    The developers also renovated and sold a historic property at 92 Mill St., and a house at 120 Mill St. is about midway through its renovations, Panteleakis said. All three houses were in a state of severe deterioration, the developers said.



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    The victim was taken to the hospital with a gunshot wound to the leg.

    CHICOPEE - One person was shot in the leg early Sunday morning in the Willimansett neighborhood.

    The victim was shot at about 3 a.m. on Meetinghouse Road and brought to the hospital by ambulance for treatment, said Michael Wilk, police public information officer.

    A caller phoned police to report hearing gunshots and then screaming. When officers arrived soon after they found the victim, he said.

    Police are actively investigating the crime. Information about the victim's condition was not immediately available, Wilk said.

    This is a breaking story. Masslive will update as more information becomes available.


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    The Massachusetts Bar Association will provide free legal advice by phone to any Western Massachusetts resident who calls the Western Massachusetts Dial-A-Lawyer program on Tuesday, Oct. 30, from 4 to 7 p.m.

    The Massachusetts Bar Association will provide free legal advice by phone to any Western Massachusetts resident who calls the Western Massachusetts Dial-A-Lawyer program on Tuesday, Oct. 30, from 4 to 7 p.m.

    Callers may ask questions on any legal topic. The program is provided by the MBA at no charge as a public service.

    Residents of Berkshire, Franklin, Hampden and Hampshire counties must dial 413-782-1659 during the three-hour program to get through to one of the dozens of volunteer lawyers who will be fielding phone calls. If the line is busy, hang up and try again. Normal telephone charges apply. The phone number will not be answered outside of the specified hours.

    "Many people in Massachusetts face unmet legal needs because their work schedules or other commitments prevent them from connecting with a lawyer, or they are unsure of where to go for help," said MBA President Christopher A. Kenney. "Our Western Mass. Dial-A-Lawyer program provides local residents with free and convenient access to a knowledgeable team of volunteer lawyers, who help us fulfill our continued commitment to increasing access to justice across the state."

    Springfield attorney Juan Rivera, one of the program's many volunteers, donates his time for the benefit of individuals who struggle to access legal services during the day.

    "It's a good service to help those people, especially elders, who wouldn't have a way of getting advice otherwise," he said.

    Volunteer Dorothy Varon, also based in Springfield, says the program "is a way of helping people who think there's no hope."

    The MBA's Dial-A-Lawyer program is co-sponsored by Western New England University School of Law, The Republican, El Pueblo Latino, the Massachusetts Association of Hispanic Attorneys and the Hispanic National Bar Association.

    The Dial-A-Lawyer program is co-sponsored by Western New England University School of Law, The Republican, El Pueblo Latino, the Massachusetts Association of Hispanic Attorneys and the Hispanic National Bar Association.

    Incorporated in 1911, the Massachusetts Bar Association is a nonprofit organization that serves the legal profession and the public by promoting the administration of justice, legal education, professional excellence and respect for the law.


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    The Wilbraham-Hampden Academic Trust (WHAT) held its first-ever Fall Gala at the Country Club of Wilbraham Saturday evening with around 140 in attendance.

    WILBRAHAM - The Wilbraham-Hampden Academic Trust (WHAT) held its first-ever Fall Gala at the Country Club of Wilbraham Saturday evening with around 140 in attendance.

    The organization, which started in 2003, has funded more than $100,000 in grants for educators in the Hampden-Wilbraham Regional School District, according to WHAT President Tina Kowalski.

    So far, the organization has assisted in 3-D printing for the middle school, community gardens at Mile Tree Elementary School and Green Meadows, reading and math resources at Soule Road Elementary School and Stony Hill School, and a recent $2,000 grant for STEM at Stony Hill.

    Held inside the new Elevation Restaurant inside the country club, Kowalski said she hoped the Saturday night gala would generate at least $25,000 for the group.The four-hour gala featured appetizers, food stations, a silent and live auction, music and dancing.

    The organization consists of 15 parents and five Board members.


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    With the Boston Red Sox only one game away from winning the World Series, Boston police announced several road closures and parking restrictions that will begin Sunday and remain in place until the series is over.

    With the Boston Red Sox only one game away from winning the World Series, Boston police announced several road closures and parking restrictions that will begin Sunday and remain in place until the series is over.

    Boston police announced the restrictions Sunday morning as the series between the Red Sox and Los Angeles Dodgers has three games remaining. Game 5 is tonight in Los Angeles.

    "In an effort to ensure the safety and security of fans following the Fall Classic, a number of street closures and parking restrictions will take effect for the remainder of the series at several locations throughout the city," Boston police said. "Again, this is less about who wins and more about being prepared for when the series is decided."

    Police reminded fans to behave responsibly. Any disruptive and disorderly behavior will not be tolerated, police said.

    Here is the list of traffic restrictions that will remain in place until the World Series is over:

    The following locations will be closed to traffic from 10:00PM to 3:00AM.

    • Commonwealth Avenue, BU Bridge to Massachusetts Avenue, both sides
    • Brookline Avenue, Beacon Street (Kenmore Square) to Pilgrim Road (except for garages/parking lots that have no other exit to another public way). All vehicles exiting under this condition shall turn in a southerly direction towards Park Drive.
    • Boylston Street, Pilgrim Road to Westland Avenue
    • Ipswich Street, Boylston Street at Hemenway St to Boylston St at Park Drive
    • Lansdowne Street, Brookline Avenue to Ipswich Street
    • Van Ness Street, Ipswich Street to Kilmarnock Street
    • Jersey Street, Boylston Street to Van Ness Street

    PARKING RESTRICTIONS:

    "No Stopping Boston Police Special Event" temporary parking restrictions will be in place at the following locations. 

    BRIGHTON AREA

    • Beacon Street - Both sides, from Chestnut Hill Avenue to Ayr Road
    • Brighton Avenue -Both sides, from Commonwealth Avenue to Allston Street
    • Cleveland Circle
    • Cassidy Playground Area - Both sides of metered area
    • Sutherland Road Area - Both sides of metered area
    • Harvard Avenue - Both sides, from Commonwealth Avenue to Cambridge Street 

    KENMORE SQUARE AREA

    • Bay State Road - Both sides, from Beacon Street to Granby Street
    • Beacon Street - Both sides, from Massachusetts Avenue to Park Drive
    • Boylston Street - Both sides, from Massachusetts Avenue to Brookline Avenue (including DCR areas)
    • Brookline Avenue - Both sides, from Beacon Street (Kenmore Square) to Pilgrim Road
    • Burlington Street - Both sides, from Brookline Avenue to the Dead End
    • Commonwealth Avenue - Both sides, both roadways, from Massachusetts Avenue to the Boston University Bridge
    • Deerfield Street - Both sides, from Commonwealth Avenue to Bay State Road
    • Fullerton Street - Both sides, from Brookline Avenue to the Dead End
    • Granby Street - Both sides, from Commonwealth Avenue to Bay State Road
    • Ipswich Street - Both sides, from Boylston Street at Hemenway Street to Boylston Street (CVS 1249 Boylston Street)
    • Jersey Street - Both sides, from Boylston Street to Peterborough Street
    • Kenmore Square in its entirety - Both sides, both roadways, from Kenmore/Raleigh Streets to Deerfield Street/Beacon Streets
    • Kilmarnock Street - Both sides, from Van Ness Street to Peterborough Street
    • Lansdowne Street - Both sides, from Brookline Avenue to Ipswich Street
    • Newbury Street Extension - Both sides, from Brookline Avenue to Charles Gate West
    • Overland Street - Both sides, from Brookline Avenue to the Dead End
    • Park Drive (DCR Roadway) - Left side, left roadway (Roberto Clemente Park side) from Aggassi Road to opposite Kilmarnock Street
    • Raleigh Street - Both sides, from Bay State Road to Commonwealth Avenue
    • Sherborn Street - Both sides, from Commonwealth Avenue to Bay State Road
    • Silber Way - Both sides, from Commonwealth Avenue to Bay State Road
    • Van Ness Street - Both sides, from Ipswich Street to Kilmarnock Street
    • Jersey Street - Both sides, from Boylston Street to Brookline Avenue
    • Fullerton Street - Both sides, from Brookline Avenue to the Dead End
    • Overland Street - Both sides, from Brookline Avenue to David Ortiz Drive

    NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY AREA

    • Gainsborough Street - Both sides, from Huntington Avenue to Hemenway Street
    • Hemenway Street - Both sides, from Forsyth Street to Boylston Street
    • Symphony Road - Both sides, from Saint Stephens Street to Hemenway Street
    • Saint Stephens Street - Both sides, from Westland Avenue to Forsyth Way
    • Opera Place - Both sides, from Saint Stephens Street to Huntington Avenue
    • Westland Avenue - Both sides, from Hemenway Street to Massachusetts Avenue

    FANEUIL HALL AREA

    • Blackstone Street - Both sides, from Hanover Street to North Street
    • Clinton Street Both sides, from North Street to Surface Road
    • Congress Street - Both sides, from New Chardon Street to State Street
    • Hanover Street - Both sides, from Congress Street to Surface Road
    • New Chardon Street - Both sides, from Cambridge Street to Merrimac Street
    • North Street - Both sides, from Surface Road to Congress Street
    • Union Street - Both sides, from North Street to Hanover Street
    • State Street - Both sides, from Surface Road to Washington Street

    NORTH STATION AREA

    • Canal Street - Both sides, from New Chardon Street to Causeway Street
    • Causeway Street - Both sides, from Merrimac Street to North Washington Street
    • Friend Street - Both sides, from New Chardon Street to Causeway Street
    • Portland Street - Both sides, from New Chardon Street to Causeway Street
    • Lancaster Street - Both sides, from Merrimac Street to Causeway Street
    • Merrimac Street - Both sides, from New Chardon Street to Causeway Street
    • Rip Valenti Way - Both sides, from Merrimac Street to North Washington Street 
     

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    Authorities released the names of all 11 victims killed when a gunman rushed into a Pittsburgh synagogue Saturday and opened fire.

    Authorities released the names of all 11 victims killed when a gunman rushed into a Pittsburgh synagogue Saturday and opened fire. 

    WPVI in Philadelphia released the names of all 11 victims. 

    They are:

    • Joyce Fineberg, 75, of Oakland, City of Pittsburgh
    • Richard Gottfried, 65, of Ross Township
    • Rose Mallinger, 97, of Squirrel Hill, City of Pittsburgh
    • Jerry Rabinowitz, 66, of Edgewood Borough
    • Cecil Rosenthal, 59, of Squirrel Hill, City of Pittsburgh
    • David Rosenthal, 54, (brother of Cecil), of Squirrel Hill
    • Bernice Simon, 84, of Wilkinsburg
    • Sylvan Simon, 86, (husband of Bernice), of Wilkinsburg
    • Daniel Stein, 71, of Squirrel Hill, City of Pittsburgh
    • Melvin Wax, 88, of Squirrel Hill, City of Pittsburgh
    • Irving Younger, 69, of Mt. Washington, City of Pittsburgh 

    The list shows a pair of brothers were killed along with a husband and wife. The oldest victim was 97-years-old. 

    People were at the Tree of Life Congregation in Pittsburgh's Squirrel Hill neighborhood Saturday morning for a baby naming ceremony when Robert Bowers allegedly went in and started shooting.

    Four police officers were injured after responding to the scene.

    Bowers reportedly posted anti-Semitic messages on the gab social media site. One post read, "jews are the children of satan."

    Bowers reportedly screamed anti-Semitic slogans as fired shots, including "all Jews must die," according to PennLive

    Authorities announced Bowers has been charged in federal court on 29 charges including hate crimes and weapons offenses.

    The Allegheny County District Attorney's office also filed charges against Bowers in  Pittsburgh Municipal Court. He will face 11 counts of murder, six counts of criminal attempt murder, six counts of aggravated assault and 13 counts of ethnic intimidation in state court, the district attorney's office announced. 


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    Call it "murderous intersection of bigotry, religious hatred and easy access to lethal weapons."

    The bishops of the two Episcopal dioceses in Massachusetts are among the religious leaders issuing statements of support to the victims of Saturday's attack on a Pittsburgh synagogue during a baby-naming ceremony that killed 11 people and injured 6, including four police officers.

    The statement from Bishops Douglas J. Fisher, Alan M. Gates, Gayle E. Harris, also pushed back on President Donald Trump's statement that the "results would have been far better" if the targeted Tree of Life synagogue had hired an armed guard.

    "A ceremony celebrating new life has become the latest setting for the murderous intersection of bigotry, religious hatred and easy access to lethal weapons," the bishops' statement reads.

    "We extend our deepest condolences, solidarity and kinship to our sisters and brothers at the Tree of Life synagogue and to the wider Jewish community throughout the nation upon the massacre today in Pittsburgh."

    It adds in part, "As people of faith, we also decry suggestions that the solution to such violence is further violence."

    "For national leaders to suggest that the solution is for our houses of worship (and by extension our schools, our movie theaters, our shopping centers and our outdoor concert venues) to be armed fortresses is to abdicate responsibility for addressing the root causes of this scourge," the statement says.

    "We continue to insist that our grief and anger must issue not only in compassion and prayer, not only in increased vigilance and security, but also in continued advocacy for measures which will resist the religious and ethnic bigotry and easy access to lethal weapons which are among those root causes."

    Fisher is bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Western Massachusetts; Gates, bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts and Harris, bishop suffragan of the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts.

    Pope Francis issued a statement following the attack as did the the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.

    "May the Lord help us to put out the hotbeds of hate that flare up in our societies, strengthening a sense of humanity, respect for life, moral and civil values and the holy fear of God, who is love and the father of all," Francis said.

    Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo, USCCB president, said, "To our brothers and sisters of the Jewish community, we stand with you.

    "We condemn all acts of violence and hate and yet again, call on our nation and public officials to confront the plague of gun violence," said DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, who was ordained a priest in the Pittsburgh diocese and now heads the Texas diocese of Galveston-Houston.

    "Violence as a response to political, racial or religious differences must be confronted with all possible effort. God asks nothing less of us," he said. "He begs us back to our common humanity as his sons and daughters."

    Authorities have arrested Robert Bowers as the suspected shooter, and were said to have recovered three Glock handguns and an AR-15 assault rifle from the synagogue. He is scheduled to make his first court appearance on Monday.

    The 46-year-old Pittsburg resident has been charged by federal prosecutors with 29 criminal counts including violence and firearms offences, and violating U.S. civil rights laws.

    He is said to be in fair condition after being shot multiple times during the attack. He is reported to have an active license to own guns.

    A year ago, a gunman killed 26 worshipers at a church in Sutherland Springs, Tex., and in 2015, a white supremacist killed nine congregants in a church in Charleston, S.C.

    Saturday's attack is believed to be the deadliest attack on the Jewish community in the U.S., according to the Anti-Defamation League.

    According to a CNN story quoting the ADL, it comes at a time when both anti-Semitic incidents and online harassment are on the rise.

    Jewish leaders condemning the attack include Rabbi Elazar Muskin, president of the Rabbinical Council of America, who CNN quoted as saying "fringe elements of society" had become "emboldened by speech which is often disrespectful and hateful."

    The Council on American-Islamic Relations called the attack "barbaric" and "an act of terror that affects us all."

    Springfield Mayor Domenic J. Sarno and Police Commissioner John Barbieri said Saturday in the wake of the synagogue attack that they had reached out to area synagogues and Springfield Jewish Community Center and will add "heightened police and security procedures and presence" to these places.


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    A federal affidavit and police reports detail the deadly shooting inside a Pittsburgh synagogue .

    During his gunfight with law enforcement inside a Pittsburgh synagogue Robert Bowers allegedly expressed hostility to people of the Jewish faith, according to a federal affidavit. 

    The federal affidavit filed in court and police report filed in a Pennsylvania state court were posted online by the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

    "During the course of his deadly assault on people at the Synagogue, and simultaneously with his gunfight with responding officers, Bowers made statements evincing an animus towards people of the Jewish faith," FBI Agent Brian Collins wrote in the federal affidavit. 

    Bowers is accused of entering the Tree of Life Congregation in Pittsburgh's Squirrel Hill neighborhood Saturday morning and opening fire. Authorities say he killed 11 people and wounded others, including four officers. 

    Bowers reportedly posted anti-Semitic messages on the gab social media site. One post read, "jews are the children of satan."

    The shooting began around 9:50 a.m. Bowers was armed with several guns including an AR-15, records show. 

    Bowers killed 11 people then went to the third floor of the building. Law enforcement responded and exchanged gunfire with Bowers. 

    "They're committing genocide to my people," Bowers allegedly told one law enforcement officer. "I just want to kill Jews." 

    Authorities say he continued to make comments about genocide. Bowers eventually surrendered to police. 

    Investigators located three .357 caliber Glock handguns and a Colt AR-15, records show. 

    Authorities announced Bowers has been charged in federal court on 29 charges including hate crimes and weapons offenses. 

    The Allegheny County District Attorney's office also filed charges against Bowers in Pittsburgh Municipal Court.

    He will face 11 counts of murder, six counts of criminal attempt murder, six counts of aggravated assault and 13 counts of ethnic intimidation in state court, the district attorney's office announced.  

    Pittsburgh police detectives wrote in a criminal complaint that two officers found Bowers at the scene armed with an assault-style rifle. He shot at the officers and they, in turn, returned fire. 

    One officer was shot in the hand. The second officer had cuts to his face from shrapnel and broken glass, according to the report. 

    A SWAT team gathered and went inside the synagogue. They saw the people who were fatally shot and then found two victims, a man and a woman, who had gunshot wounds. 

    SWAT medics and officers carried those two victims outside, the detectives wrote. 

    The team followed Bowers to the third floor. He began to shoot at the officers. 

    "During the gunfire, Officer 3 was shot multiple times and critically wounded," the report states. "Officer 4 was also shot multiple times by the actor." 

    The injured officers were carried outside as SWAT team members fired at Bowers. Police said in the report that Bowers was wounded in the exchange of gunfire. 

    "While in custody Bowers made statements to SWAT Operator David Blahut that he wanted all Jews to die and also that they (Jews) were committing genocide to his people," the report said.


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    The event is one step in the effort to fight the opioid epidemic.

    Residents in 17 communities in Hampshire and Franklin counties turned in a total of 1,759 unwanted medications in the National Prescription Drug Take Back Day collection day held Saturday.

    The event was held to help residents remove unused and unwanted drugs safely from their homes so they cannot be accessed by children or abused by other people. It is one step in the effort to control the opioid epidemic, said Northwestern District Attorney David Sullivan, whose office sponsored the local efforts.

    "This is one of the most important initiatives we participate in to help combat drug addiction," Sullivan said in a statement announcing the success of this year's collection.

    Along with helping people clean out medicine cabinets, the effort also prevents unwanted and out-of-date drugs from being thrown in the garbage or flushed down the toilet, which can contaminate the environment. Pharmaceuticals have been found in some of the nation's waterways, he said.

    This year 17 communities in Hampshire and Franklin Counties participated in the collection. They are Amherst, Belchertown, Cummington, Easthampton, Goshen, Hadley, Northampton, Pelham, Southampton, South Hadley, Williamsburg, Worthington, Deerfield, Greenfield, Leverett, Montague and Sunderland.

    A number of communities in Hampden County also participated in the effort including Springfield and Longmeadow.

    Multiple police departments also have drug collection boxes in station lobbies. Anyone can drop off unused medications there at any time with no questions asked. Some of the collection boxes are located in Chicopee, Belchertown, Greenfield, Orange, Monson, Agawam, Amherst, Easthampton and Northampton.

    All drugs collected are incinerated.


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    Michael Thorpe, 36, was charged with multiple offenses including threatening to commit murder, assault and battery on a disabled person over 60 and breaking and entering in the daytime.

    GREAT BARRINGTON - A 36-year-old man accused of kicking in a door and robbing, assaulting and threatening to kill the resident was arrested at a local hotel.

    Michael Thorpe Jr., 36, of Great Barrington, was charged with breaking and entering in the daytime for a felony, assault and battery on a disabled person over 60, threatening to commit murder, unarmed robbery of a person over 60, destruction of property and trespassing.

    Thorpe allegedly broke into a Park Street home of someone he knew last week. The resident made the report on Wednesday but police did not say when the crime occurred, Police Chief William Walsh said.

    The resident confronted him after seeing him carrying her purse, Walsh said.

    "He then allegedly assaulted her, threatened to kill her and demanded any money or prescriptions she had in her possession," he said.

    He is accused of stealing some cash and fleeing. Officer Samuel Stolzar later tracked him down at the Monument Mountain Hotel and arrested him, Walsh said.

    The victim was brought to a local hospital for treatment of injuries which are not believed to be critical, he said.

    Thorpe was initially held on $10,000 bail and was arraigned in Southern Berkshire District Court on Thursday, Walsh said.


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    A man wearing pajamas ran from police in one Massachusetts town after stealing the keys to a truck from inside a home.

     

    A man wearing pajamas ran from police in one Massachusetts town after stealing the keys to a truck from inside a home.

    Dartmouth Police Officer Manuel Demelo was on patrol around 5 a.m. Sunday when he saw a 2007 Ford F150 fail to stop at a stop sign.

    The officer tried to stop the truck, but the driver hit the gas.

    Demelo saw the truck leave the road as the driver failed to make the turn onto Smith Neck Road.

    "After crashing, Officer Demolo observed a thin white male with dirty blonde hair wearing pajamas exit the vehicle and run into the woods," police said.

    Officers, with the assistance of a K-9, searched the area, but could not find the suspect.

    Police learned the suspect broke into a home in Dartmouth and stole the keys to the truck. Authorities continue to search for the suspect.


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