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    Sanders said: 'Question 1 would set a safe maximum on the number of patients nurses can treat, so that patients can receive the quality care they deserve.'

    U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders, a Vermont independent, has endorsed the Massachusetts ballot question that would mandate specific nurse to patient staffing ratios.

    Sanders, who ran as a Democratic candidate for president in 2016 on a platform of universal health care, released a statement Sunday taking a position on ballot questions in several states, including Question 1 in Massachusetts.

    "Nurses are the backbone of our health care system. They are there with us when we are born, when we are sick and in the last years of our lives," Sanders said. "They must be allowed to do the quality work that they have trained for." 

    Sanders continued, "Question 1 would set a safe maximum on the number of patients nurses can treat, so that patients can receive the quality care they deserve. Nurses are behind this initiative, and I trust them when it comes to knowing what is best for their patients."

    Supporters of Question 1 say mandating nurse staffing will ensure that care is equal around the state and that nurses do not have more patients than they can safely care for. Opponents say the staffing ratios are too rigid and inflexible, and the added cost will require hospitals to shut beds and units. 


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    "For the dead, we have to keep on living," said School Committee member Laurie Garcia.

    EASTHAMPTON -- Dozens of local residents gathered at the Nashawannuck Pond Boardwalk Sunday night to mourn, honor, and remember the 11 people of Jewish faith who were massacred Saturday at the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh.

    Adults and children held candles as names of the dead were read aloud, followed by the honorific "may their memories be for a blessing."

    Local leaders in the Jewish community spoke of their own experiences with anti-Semitism, and said they believe our nation is headed in a dangerous direction. 

    "I'm so tired of having to say, 'never again,' said Melissa Weinberger. "We all need to recommit; to use everything within our power to end this reign of hatred that has taken hold of our country."

    "As we say in the Jewish faith, may their memories be a blessing," said Owen Zaret, a city councilor. "And yet we shouldn't really have to be here honoring their memories, because they shouldn't be dead. They should be home watching the World Series. Or wondering what to have for dinner. Or planning their week."

    Zaret told of his grandfather, Irving Zaretsky, a Russian Jew who at the age of 14 returned home to find his family slaughtered. He made his way to Germany, to England, and eventually to New York, where he opened a kosher butcher shop.

    "Even then, he was called a dirty Jew, and had rocks thrown through his window," remarked Zaret. He said that with his Americanized name, people often don't realize he's Jewish, and sometimes make anti-Semitic remarks in his presence.

    "I'm kind of a silent minority," said Zaret.

    Laurie Garcia, a member of the Easthampton School Committee, teaches Spanish at West Springfield High School. She said educators should talk to their students about the shooting.

    "If we don't talk about it, we normalize it," advised Garcia, who also said people, including her students, don't always realize that she's Jewish. 

    She said she organized a "mix it up day" at the high school, where people sat at lunch with those they would never have thought of sitting with before.

    Garcia recited a prayer for peace often read at her synagogue.

    "Let love and justice flow like a mighty stream," she said. "Let peace fill the earth as the waters fill the sea."

    "And let us say: Amen," responded the crowd.

    Zaret said violence against one is violence against all.


    "So what happens now? Are Muslims attacked because of how they worship, or what they wear? Does a police officer get gunned down because someone doesn't like the police? Or does a gay and lesbian couple get attacked because of who they choose to love?"

    As for politics, Zaret said "we don't need to agree, but this violence has got to end."

    Mayor Nicole LaChapelle called the shooting a "devastating and sickening event," and said it was concurrently "disheartening and heartwarming" to see so many people gather in response to the tragedy.

    The crowd grew to around 50 as a local police vehicle sat quietly at the outskirts to ensure everyone's safety.

    Sarah Weinberger, who helped organize the vigil, said those who survived and witnessed Saturday's shooting are also victims.

    "This will be embedded in their memories forever," she said.

    Zaret recited the Mourner's Kaddish and many in attendance joined in.

    "For the dead, we have to keep on living," said Garcia.

    Killed Saturday were Rose Mallinger, 97; Cecil and David Rosenthal, two brothers in their 50s; Bernice Simon and her husband Sylvan, in their 80s; Joyce Fienberg, 75; Richard Gottfried, 65; Jerry Rabinowitz, 66; Daniel Stein, 71; Melvin Wax, 88; and Irving Younger, 69.

    Six others were wounded, including four police officers. Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto called the attack the "darkest day of Pittsburgh's history."

    federal complaint charges that gunman Robert Bowers, 46, burst into the unlocked synagogue Saturday morning and opened fire while yelling about his hatred for Jews, and surrendered after exchanging gunfire with police.

    Bowers faces 29 federal counts, including 11 of obstructing the exercise of religious beliefs resulting in death. Attorney General Jeff Sessions said Bowers could see the death penalty.


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    A search and rescue effort has been launched for the Boeing 737-800 plane which departed Jakarta about 6.20 a.m. for Pangkal Pinang.

    JAKARTA, Indonesia -- A Lion Air plane with 189 people on board crashed into the sea just minutes after taking off from Indonesia's capital on Monday in a blow to the country's aviation safety record after the lifting of bans on its airlines by the European Union and U.S.

    Indonesia's disaster agency posted photos online of a crushed smartphone, books, bags and parts of the aircraft fuselage that had been collected by search and rescue vessels that have converged on the area.

    Lion Air said the brand-new aircraft, on a 1-hour-and-10-minute flight to Pangkal Pinang on an island chain off Sumatra, was carrying 181 passengers, including one child and two babies, and eight crew members.

    Indonesian TV broadcast pictures of a fuel slick and debris field. Distraught friends and relatives prayed and hugged each other as they waited at Pangkal Pinang's airport.

    The National Search and Rescue Agency's deputy chief, Nugroho Budi Wiryanto, said some 300 people including soldiers, police and local fishermen are involved in the search and that so far it has recovered no bodies -- only ID cards, personal belongings and aircraft debris.

    At the agency's headquarters in Jakarta, family members turned up, hoping desperately for news.

    Feni, who uses a single name, said her soon to be married sister was on the flight, planning to meet relatives in Pangkal Pinang.

    "We are here to find any information about my younger sister, her fiance, her in-law to be and a friend of them," said Feni.

    "We don't have any information," she said, as her father wiped tears from reddened eyes. "No one provided us with any information that we need. "We're confused. We hope that our family is still alive," she said.

    Indonesia's Finance Minister Sri Mulyani also arrived at the agency and met with its chief, seeking information about 20 finance ministry staff who were on the flight after attending a ministry event in Jakarta.

    The search and rescue agency said the flight ended in waters off West Java that are 30 to 35 meters (98 to 115 feet) deep.

    The agency's chief Muhammad Syaugi told a news conference that divers are trying to locate the wreckage.

    The Boeing 737 Max 8 was delivered to Lion Air in mid-August and put in use within days, according to aviation website Flightradar24. Malindo Air, a Malaysian subsidiary of Jakarta-based Lion Air, was the first airline to being using the 737 Max 8 last year. The Max 8 replaced the similar 800 in the Chicago-based planemaker's product line.

    Boeing spokesman Paul Lewis says Boeing is "closely monitoring the situation" but did not provide details on the aircraft in question.

    The pilot of Flight 610 had more than 6,000 flying hours while the co-pilot had more than 5,000 hours.

    Indonesia's Transport Ministry said the plane took off from Jakarta about 6.20 a.m. and crashed just 13 minutes later. Data from FlightAware showed it had reached an altitude of only 5,200 feet (1,580 meters).

    The transport ministry said crisis centers have been set up Pangkal Pinang's airport and Jakarta's Soekarno Hatta airport.

    The crash is the worst airline disaster in Indonesia since an AirAsia flight from Surabaya to Singapore plunged into the sea in December 2014, killing all 162 on board.

    Indonesian airlines were barred in 2007 were flying to Europe because of safety concerns, though several were allowed to resume services in the following decade. The ban was completely lifted in June this year. The U.S. lifted a decadelong ban in 2016.

    Lion Air, a discount carrier, is one of Indonesia's youngest and biggest airlines, flying to dozens of domestic and international destinations.

    In 2013, one of its Boeing 737-800 jets missed the runway while landing on the resort island of Bali, crashing into the sea without causing any fatalities among the 108 people on board.

    --By Stephen Wright and Niniek Karmini


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    Advocates for sexual assault victims worry that repealing the law will lead to increased incidents of violence against transgender individuals.

    In one ad, a man peeps through the door of a bathroom stall at a teenage girl changing in a locker room. In another, a mother describes a boy coming into a locker room to change with her daughter.

    The ballot committee to repeal Massachusetts's transgender anti-discrimination law, called Keep MA Safe, has made protecting safety and privacy a cornerstone of its campaign. 

    But advocates for sexual assault victims say they have the opposite fear - that repealing the law will lead to increased incidents of violence against transgender individuals.

    "The safety issues I think for transgender people are significant," said Gina Scaramella, executive director of the Boston Area Rape Crisis Center. "The safety issues for the general population are nonexistent."

    The law up for repeal, which was signed in 2016, bans discrimination against transgender people in public places and allows a transgender person to use the bathroom or locker room that conforms with their gender identity. A yes vote on Question 3 would uphold the law; a no vote would repeal it.

    Advocates for repeal have focused on the potential for problems in sex-segregated spaces.

    "The way the law is written, gender identity is a state of mind, that means that any man can say he is a woman if anyone challenges his presence in a women's restroom," said Yvette Ollada, a spokeswoman for the No on 3 campaign.

    The law provides guidance for how individuals must deal with a situation where there is a question about whether someone is using the correct facility. Repeal advocates note that there are penalties for not conforming with the law.

    "This law, with these penalties the way they are, intimidates women from speaking up when they are uncomfortable with a convicted sex offender or predator in a women's space," Ollada said. "This especially endangers those this law was intended to help."

    To bolster their case, the law's opponents point to cases involving men committing crimes against women in sex-segregated spaces.

    Ollada pointed to a Plainville case where a man was charged with sticking his cellphone into a women's bathroom stall to take her picture. (The case was later dismissed.) There is no indication that the transgender law was implicated, although Ollada suggested the law could make it harder for store security to remove the man.

    The Keep MA Safe website links to a national website that details crimes such as peeping or taking pictures in spaces like dressing rooms and bathrooms. That site lists six instances in Massachusetts, but all involved men presenting as men. At least three occurred before the transgender law was signed.

    "In the two years since this became law, there's been no increase in public safety issues. There's no evidence that this law creates any problems," said Debra Robbin, executive director of Jane Doe Inc., the Massachusetts Coalition Against Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence. Robbin said laws are already in place to address privacy violations or assault.

    A study conducted in Massachusetts by the Williams Institute at the UCLA School of Law found no link between allowing transgender people to use the restroom of their choice and bathroom-related crime rates.

    "Obviously, what the (No on 3) ad is doing is exploiting a fear," said Scaramella. 

    Advocates who work with victims of sexual assault say their biggest fear is for transgender people if the law is repealed.

    "If people don't have their full rights and freedoms in a society, they're more easily exploited and become victims of violence," said Marianne Winters, executive director of Safe Passage, which provides emergency shelter for domestic violence victims in Hampshire County.

    Winters said people who are transgender, or are otherwise marginalized in society, tend to face higher risks of domestic violence. They are more likely to be isolated, which makes them easier targets for violence. They also face discrimination when trying to get help. 

    According to Massachusetts and national statistics, transgender women are more likely to be sexually assaulted than cisgender women. More transgender women report threats of violence by an intimate partner. 

    "When a group experiences discrimination, it increases a sense of isolation and decreases the initial trust they have in institutions," Winters said.

    Scaramella said similarly, "Context and culture matter a lot in terms of who is assaulted, and when offenders look for someone to assault or exploit, they tend to look for the person they perceive as the most vulnerable."

    Carmen Nieves, executive manager of Womanshelter/Companeras, a Holyoke organization that runs a domestic violence shelter in Western Massachusetts, said anyone who identifies as female is welcome in their women's shelter. She has never had any problems with transgender women. "If they identify as a woman, they can come in," Nieves said.

    Rebecca Lockwood, associate director of counseling and rape crisis services for the Center for Women and Community at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, said the vast majority of sexual violence occurs between people who know one another.

    "Having folks choose the bathroom that corresponds with their gender identity isn't going to increase the risk in any way," Lockwood said. "This idea that either someone masquerading as a trans person or a trans person is suddenly going to open the floodgates for people to be assaulted in the bathrooms, it just doesn't hold water with the research that's out there."

    Victim advocates say their concern is that the No on 3 ads will contribute to stereotypes of transgender people as predators.

    "They're creating stereotypes that transgender people are somehow out to hurt other people when the data show transgender people are more at risk for sexual assault than cisgender people are," Robbin said.


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    Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos was spotted dining at a Kendall Square restaurant in Cambridge with his family over the weekend.

     

    Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos was spotted dining at a Kendall Square restaurant in Cambridge with his family over the weekend.

    The Boston Globe reported that the billionaire and his family ate dinner at Sumiao Hunan Kitchen on Saturday and posed for a photo with restaurant manager Tony Mo.

    There was reportedly no explanation for why Bezos was in the city, although Boston is a contender for Amazon's proposed second headquarters. The company is also opening a 430,000-square-foot office in the Seaport, which is scheduled to open in 2021.

    Earlier this year, a study from New York-based The Conference Board found that Boston and Washington, D.C. metro areas are the "most likely candidates" to win the bid for Amazon's second headquarters.

    The e-commerce giant second headquarters campus could house 50,000 high-paying jobs in an 8 million-square-foot campus and generate $5 billion in investment.


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    A business proposing to locate a recreational marijuana dispensary in downtown Springfield has scheduled a community meeting on Nov. 3.

    SPRINGFIELD -- A company interested in opening a recreational marijuana store downtown has scheduled a community meeting regarding its proposed site at 1665 Main St.

    The applicant, TDMA LLC, is linked to a company in Oregon, Diem Cannabis, that has five marijuana licenses in that state, said Chris Mitchem, co-founder and CEO of Diem Cannabis.

    TDMA is also pursuing marijuana facilities in Worcester, Lynn and Orange, Mitchem said.

    The proposed site in Springfield is the one-time headquarters of Hampden Savings Bank. The 100-year-old building was a law office for five decades before closing in recent years.

    "Our goal is to enrich the community both with our knowledge of how to roll out cannabis safely and effectively, and also creating jobs to the city, and once open, creating significant tax revenue," Mitchem said.

    The community outreach meeting is slated Nov. 3, at 10 a.m., at the Tower Square Hotel, 2 Boland Way.

    It marks the first proposal for a marijuana retail store in Springfield since the sale of marijuana was recently approved by the City Council.

    Any proposal will need approvals from the city and state.

    The community meeting is required under city and state law as part of the application process for a recreational marijuana dispensary. The developer will provide details of its plans and answer questions, according to a notice of the meeting.

    Abutters have been notified along with the community meeting notice, Mitchem said.

    He said the Springfield location is beautiful and historic, but will take hundreds of thousands of dollars in renovations. There is an agreement to purchase the building, he said.

    "We are really excited to bring this building back to its former glory," Mitchem said. It is on the National Register of Historic Places.

    No application for the dispensary has been submitted to the city thus far as the community meeting is first required, city Deputy Planner Philip Dromey said. In addition, he said he had not received other information yet about the potential business.

    The notice of the community meeting lists a website for information about the company: hellodiem.com/ma/.

    TDMS is proposing a single dispensary in Worcester at one of three proposed sites, Mitchem said: 74 Grafton St., 1130 Pleasant St., and 205 Summer St.

    There is a marijuana shop proposed in Lynn, and a marijuana cultivation and production facility is proposed in Orange at 3 Quabbin Boulevard, he said.

    Diem Cannabis has three locations in Salem and Portland, Oregon, with a total of five marijuana licenses for dispensary, cultivation, production, and delivery functions.

    According to a Portland Business Journal story, Diem Cannabis has a deal with a Canadian company to receive up to $12.5 million to develop business in Massachusetts.

    In Springfield, the City Council approved an ordinance allowing up to 15 marijuana retail stores, as well as provisions allowing other types of marijuana businesses. Additional rules and regulations remain under review by the council.


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    3 men, including 1 with a gun, robbed a convenience store at 477 Boston Road.

    SPRINGFIELD - Police are on the scene of a reported armed robbery at a Boston Road convenience store

    According to police spokesman Ryan Walsh, police were called to the One Stop Market, 477 Boston Road, just before 8 a.m.

    A clerk told officers that three men entered the store, and one of them brandished a firearm and demanded cash from the register.

    They fled with an undisclosed amount of cash, Walsh said.

    No one was injured.

    The incident remains under investigation.

    Police did not provide descriptions of the suspects.


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    The comedy series is being developed by John Tobin Presents of Boston.

    MGM Springfield announced the first acts to play its new comedy club, Roar!, which opens its door at the historic Armory there in January.

    The comedy series is being developed by John Tobin Presents of Boston.

    "Entertainment is the cornerstone of MGM Springfield's experience in downtown Springfield," said Talia Spera, executive director of entertainment of MGM Springfield. "The partnership with John Tobin Presents to create the new ROAR! Comedy Series reinforces our commitment to energizing the city and enriching downtown entertainment."

    Tickets go on sale Friday at 10 a.m. and prices for these specific shows will range between $23-33, future show prices may vary.

    All tickets are available through Ticketmaster.

    The comedians scheduled to perform at Roar! include:

    • Roy Wood Jr. - Friday and Saturday, Jan. 4-5
    • Sam Morril - Thursday-Saturday, Jan. 10-12
    • Chris Distefano - Friday and Saturday, Jan.y 18-19
    • Rafinha Bastos - Sunday, Jan. 20
    • Michael Kosta - Friday and Saturday, Jan. 25-26
    • K Trevor Wilson - Thursday-Saturday, Jan. 31-February 2
    • Michael Yo - Friday and Saturday, Feb. 15-16
    • Phil Hanley - Friday-Sunday, Feb. 28-March 2
    • Samuel Comroe - Thursday-Saturday, March 21-23
    • Rachel Feinstein - Friday and Saturday, March 29-30
    • Bret Ernst - Thursday-Saturday, April 4-6
    • Tim Dillon - Thursday-Saturday, April 11-13
    • Robert Kelly - Thursday-Saturday, April 18-20
    • Alonzo Bodden - Thursday-Saturday, May 2-4

    Tobin has been a mainstay in the Boston Comedy scene since 1992, when he started as a doorman at a local comedy club. Today, John Tobin Presents, produces and operates shows in and around Boston at well-known clubs and venues such as Laugh Boston, The Comedy Scene at Patriot Place, The Boch Center, The Norwood Theatre, WooHaHa! Comedy Club and the legendary Nick's Comedy Stop.

    We are extremely excited to be partnering with MGM Springfield in this new venture," said John Tobin, CEO of John Tobin Presents. "They are an incredible organization to work with. The Armory is a magnificent venue and it's going to be a stunning space for guests of MGM and people throughout the area to come check out the funniest stand-up comedians working today."

    The Armory was originally built for the Massachusetts Militia and later used by the Massachusetts National Guard. The Armory is now used as stunning event space, activated with pop-up art galleries, seasonal events, concerts and more.


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    A Lion Air plane that crashed into seas northeast of Jakarta likely killed all 189 people on board.

    A Lion Air plane crashed into the sea just minutes after taking off from Indonesia's capital on Monday, likely killing all 189 people on board. The accident was a blow to the country's aviation safety record after the lifting of bans on its airlines by the European Union and U.S.

    The search and rescue effort has recovered human remains, and based on their condition, one of its top officials said they're not expecting to find any survivors.

    More than 300 people including soldiers, police and fishermen are involved in the grim search, retrieving aircraft debris and personal items such as a crumpled cellphone, ID cards, bags and photos from the seas northeast of Jakarta.

    The accident involving a new plane has stunned Indonesia, and President Joko Widodo ordered the transport safety commission to investigate. He urged Indonesians to "keep on praying" as rescuers search for victims.

    An air transport official, Novie Riyanto, said the flight was cleared to return to Jakarta after the pilot made a "return to base" request two to three minutes after taking off. It plunged into the sea about 10 minutes later. Weather conditions were normal but the aircraft had experienced a technical issue on its previous flight.

    Lion Air said the jet, on a 1 hour and 10 minute flight to Pangkal Pinang on an island chain off Sumatra, was carrying 181 passengers, including one child and two babies, and eight crew members.

    It said there were two foreigners on board the plane: its pilot, originally from New Delhi, and an Italian citizen.

    Distraught friends and relatives prayed and hugged each other as they waited at Pangkal Pinang's airport and at a crisis center set up at Jakarta's airport. Indonesian TV broadcast pictures of a fuel slick and a debris field in the ocean.

    At the search agency's headquarters in Jakarta, family members arrived, hoping desperately for news.

    Feni, who uses a single name, said her soon-to-be-married sister was on the flight, planning to meet relatives in Pangkal Pinang.

    "We are here to find any information about my younger sister, her fiance, her in-law to be and a friend of them," said Feni.

    "We don't have any information," she said, as her father wiped tears from reddened eyes. "No one provided us with any information that we need. We're confused. We hope that our family is still alive."

    Indonesian Finance Minister Sri Mulyani also arrived at the agency and met with its chief, seeking information about 20 ministry staff who were on the flight after attending a ministry event in Jakarta. Photos circulating online showed the distraught minister trying to comfort stunned colleagues.

    The search and rescue agency said the flight ended in waters off West Java that are 30 to 35 meters (100 to 115 feet) deep.

    The agency's chief, Muhammad Syaugi, told a news conference that divers are trying to locate the wreckage.

    Weather conditions for the flight were safe, according to the Indonesian meteorology agency. It said clouds associated with turbulence were not present and winds were weak.

    The Boeing 737 Max 8 was delivered to Lion Air in mid-August and put in use within days, according to aviation website Flightradar24. It was leased from China Minsheng Investment Group Leasing Holdings Ltd., according to the official China News Service.

    Malindo Air, a Malaysian subsidiary of Jakarta-based Lion Air, was the first airline to begin using the 737 Max 8 last year. The Max 8 replaced the similar 800 in the Chicago-based plane maker's product line.

    Lion Air president-director Edward Sirait said the plane had a "technical problem" on its previous flight from Bali to Jakarta but it had been fully remedied. He didn't know specifics of the problem when asked in a TV interview. The pilot of Flight 610 had more than 6,000 flying hours while the co-pilot had more than 5,000 hours, according to the airline.

    "Indeed there were reports about a technical problem, and the technical problem has been resolved in accordance with the procedures released by the plane manufacturer," he said. "I did not know exactly but let it be investigated by the authorities."

    Boeing Co. said it was "deeply saddened" by the crash and was prepared to provide technical assistance to Indonesia's crash probe.

    The Transport Ministry said the plane took off from Jakarta at about 6:20 a.m. and crashed just 13 minutes later. Data from FlightAware showed it had reached an altitude of only 5,200 feet (1,580 meters).

    The crash is the worst airline disaster in Indonesia since an AirAsia flight from Surabaya to Singapore plunged into the sea in December 2014, killing all 162 on board.

    Indonesian airlines were barred in 2007 from flying to Europe because of safety concerns, though several were allowed to resume services in the following decade.

    The ban was completely lifted in June this year. The U.S. lifted a decadelong ban in 2016.

    Lion Air, a discount carrier, is one of Indonesia's youngest and biggest airlines, flying to dozens of domestic and international destinations.

    In 2013, one of its Boeing 737-800 jets missed the runway while landing on Bali, crashing into the sea without causing any fatalities among the 108 people on board.


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    A tornado warning and multiple thunderstorm warnings have been issued for Massachusetts communities.

    A tornado warning and multiple thunderstorm warnings have been issued for Massachusetts communities. 

    A tornado warning was issued for multiple communities on the Cape and Martha's Vineyard following radar reports indicating a possible tornado and quarter-sized hail. Shortly before it was set to expire at 10:15 a.m., the National Weather Service expanded the warning to more communities on Cape Cod and extended it until 10:45 a.m. Monday. 

    Multiple severe thunderstorm warnings have been issued for Massachusetts. 

    A thunderstorm warning was issued for Dukes County prior to the tornado warning. A warning was issued shortly after for a portion of Plymouth County, which remains in effect until 10:15 a.m. Monday. A severe thunderstorm warning was issued for multiple communities near Boston, which remains in effect until 10:45 a.m. Monday. 

    An additional warning was issued for communities on the tip of the Cape around 10:20 a.m. Monday. It will remain in effect until 11 a.m. 


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    Owner Jennifer Cruz started off selling macarons at farmers markets and opened a shop last year in the Eastfield Mall. She relocated downtown in September. Watch video

    SPRINGFIELD -- Springfield's Market Street outdoor pedestrian shopping plaza  might not be the Champs-Elysees -- it only goes from Harrison Street to Bruce Landon Way -- but now it has macarons, those tiny almond flour cookies that somehow convey freshness in a single bite.

    This section of the city has some new joie de vivre now that baker Jennifer Cruz has moved her Springfield Macarons business to space that was once part of the much beloved Johnson's Bookstore, at the rear of 1383 Main St.

    "Downtown is where its at," Cruz said.

    She moved Sept. 26 after about 10 months at the Eastfield Mall, where Cruz opened a location after making her name selling macarons at area farmers markets.

    The Eastfield Mall space, once a Radio Shack, was adequate, Cruz said. But the mall is all the way out Boston Road. Much of her business is assembling gift baskets. -- and that means a lot of orders from offices for co-workers.

    "I need to be close to downtown so people can pick up their orders," she said. "And I get so much foot traffic."

    Cruz said Laura Masulis, MassDevelopment's Transformative Development Initiative
    Fellow for Springfield, introduced her to her new landlord. The landlord, Cruz said, was looking for a new tenant who had a "treat" or sold a fun foodstuff for the space. The building already has a FedEx Office Print & Ship Center and other offices.

    A few steps away, The Shops at Marketplace at the rear of 1341 Main St. offers Nosh Cafe & Restaurant and a cluster of shops. Sweet Ideas Coffee Shop is nearby as well.

    Cuz said she plans to stay in her redecorated downtown space for the long haul and wants to install commercial bakery and kitchen equipment. She currently bakes elsewhere.

    Macarons are made with almond flour, she said, so they're gluten free.

    "People are afraid gluten free won't taste good,"she said. "These taste good."

    And making macarons allows Cruz some creativity  to add flavor -- coconut is popular -- and color. She can even mix custom colors to match theme colors for weddings.

    "I started out as an artist," she said. "Now, I paint with almond flour."


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    "A waterspout is a whirling column of air and water mist."

    A reported waterspout was spotted off the coast of Cape Cod during severe thunderstorms Monday morning. 

    The National Weather Service says a photo shared with meteorologists shows a reported waterspout southwest of Woods Hole, in the Vineyard Sound. 

    "A waterspout is a whirling column of air and water mist," the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says of the weather phenomenon. Waterspouts fall into two categories: fair weather waterspouts and tornadic waterspouts.

    The latter are tornadoes formed over water or that move from land to water. They have the same characteristics as a land tornado and are often strong winds, large hail and frequent lightning. 

    Fair weather waterspouts are not generally associated with thunderstorms, forming in light wind conditions so they move little. "While tornadic waterspouts develop downward in a thunderstorm, a fair weather waterspout develops on the surface of the water and works its way upward," the NOAA says. "By the time the funnel is visible, a fair weather waterspout is near maturity." 


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    According to the Anti-Defamation League, which tracks hate crimes, there were 177 anti-Semitic incidents in Massachusetts in 2017.

    On Saturday, an anti-Semitic shooter murdered 11 Jews at a Pittsburgh synagogue. 

    While the shooting was unconnected to Massachusetts, the state is no stranger to anti-Semitism. According to the Anti-Defamation League, which tracks hate crimes, there were 177 anti-Semitic incidents in Massachusetts in 2017, generally harassment and vandalism, up 42 percent over the prior year.

    Gov. Charlie Baker, asked Monday how he will keep Massachusetts' Jewish community safe, said, "Any anti-Semitic act, any act of hate or terror or violence or vandalism against anybody or any organization because of their religion, their race, their sexual orientation is zero tolerance here in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts."

    Baker said the state put together a hate crimes task force last year, which meets regularly and includes people from law enforcement, faith communities and leaders from communities of color. It is led by Massachusetts Public Safety and Security Secretary Daniel Bennett and CEO and President of Boys and Girls Clubs of Boston Josh Kraft.

    Representatives of Jewish organizations on the task force include the Jewish Federation of the Berkshires Executive Director Dara Kaufman and Robert Trestan, executive director of the Anti-Defamation League's New England Regional Office.

    Baker said the task force met last week and plans to meet again mid-November.

    "The things we talked about at the last meeting were a series of initiatives, most of which were around awareness, intelligence gathering, preemptive things that can be done by the law enforcement community and by the education community to support communities of faith in dealing with many of these issues," Baker said.

    Baker said after the Pittsburgh shooting, his office reached out to municipal police leaders to ask if they needed any help providing security for houses of worship.

    Baker also spoke Sunday at a vigil in Boston for the victims of the Pittsburgh shooting.


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    Retired U.S. Postal worker Kenneth LaFlamme pleaded not guilty to bribery and other charges in U.S. DIstrict Court.

    SPRINGFIELD -- Retired U.S. Postal Service worker Kenneth LaFlamme pleaded not guilty to federal bribery, witness tampering and other charges in U.S. District Court on Monday.

    LaFlamme, 54, formerly of Springfield and now of Fort Myers, Florida, was charged earlier this month in connection with accepting bribes from two area towing contractors while he was a supervisor at a regional Postal Service maintenance facility.

    LaFlamme received $5-per-tow kickbacks from both contractors, labeled "Businessman One" and "Businessman Two" in court records. Sources with knowledge of the investigation said the alleged victims in the case are Bach Towing, in East Longmeadow and Hook Ups Towing of Ludlow.

    The owners of both companies previously declined to comment on the case.

    LaFlamme once oversaw the vehicle maintenance facility on Page Boulevard, where ailing and broken-down vehicles are towed for repairs and upkeep. He took the bribes from the businessmen between 2015 and 2017, according to the charges. The kickbacks amounted to thousands over that time period, federal investigators have said.

    He waived his right to indictment during a brief proceeding, and pleaded not guilty to one count each to bribery of a public official, witness tampering and making false statements to federal officials.

    "Do you understand the charges against you?" U.S. Magistrate Judge Katherine Robertson asked LaFlamme.

    "Yes, I do," he said.

    Assistant U.S. Attorney Steven Breslow told the judge the government and defense attorney David P. Hoose will begin plea negotiations before the next pretrial conference.

    That is set for Dec. 19.


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    Bewsee, who co-founded the Springfield agency 33 years ago, said, "I don't want city councilors and elected officials to stop being afraid of me just yet." Watch video

    SPRINGFIELD -- Michaelann Bewsee, who co-founded Arise for Social Justice 33 years ago and served as its executive director the past decade, is retiring, but said Friday she is not going away and will continue to advocate for the rights and well-being of the poor.

    "I'm not going anywhere," Bewsee said. "I don't want city councilors and elected officials to stop being afraid of me just yet. I'll actually be able to work on the issues that I care about and not have to worry about the fundraising and office security and getting keys made and all the other kind of stuff that goes with being director."

    Arise has been involved in many local and national issues affecting low-income residents and others, ranging from its prolonged fight to bring ward representation to the city to its opposition to a biomass plant in East Springfield, to its advocacy for greater aid to the homeless.

    Bewsee welcomed her successor as executive director, Tanisha Arena, on Friday, and will stay on at Arise for approximately a month to provide hands-on training.

    Bewsee's work and community activism were a factor in her being named a William Pynchon Award recipient in 2016. She is a Springfield resident and has lived here most of her life.

    "I feel at Arise that our best work is yet to come," Bewsee said. "Unfortunately, people are just as poor now and poorer in fact than when Arise got started. Forty-two percent of the people in this city earn less than $25,000 a year, and to me that means they are all at risk of homelessness or not being able to meet their basic human needs."

    Arise has strongly advocated on issues of concern to families and communities including housing needs, homelessness, criminal justice, environmental justice and public health, she said.

    Bewsee said she believes her greatest pride came from Arise's prolonged campaign, including legal action, to help bring ward representation to the city, changing the City Council from a system of nine at-large seats to a mix of five at-large seats and eight ward seats.

    The change to the council, and similarly to the School Committee, has led to far more minorities serving in local elective office and making city government more reflective of the community, she said.

    Bewsee said Arise helped block the construction of a new biomass wood-burning plant in Springfield with strong opposition over the years and aiding with legal action against the plans. The company, Palmer Renewable Energy, continues to pursue the project, denying criticism that it will lead to increased pollution and harm public health.

    Bewsee also took pride in Arise for creating a tent encampment for the homeless in 2004 on the grounds of St. Michael's Cathedral without permission after protesting that the homeless were not being provided with adequate shelter and services.

    Arise helped organize and supply the encampment, known as Sanctuary City, that relocated from the cathedral grounds to a nearby large parking lot. It lasted six months until Open Pantry Community Services reopened the Warming Place shelter.

    Bewsee said she also takes pride in Arise's advocacy against police brutality and for diversity in police promotions and its efforts to promote and help draft a climate change plan in Springfield.

    Such issues affect all people, but particularly the poor and disadvantaged, she said.

    Arise was formed in 1985 after then-Gov. Edward King and the state Legislature were involved in a budget battle that included cutting welfare benefits, Bewsee said. She contacted a few other concerned women, organized at her house, and created Arise, she said.

    The group started out concentrating on welfare benefits, and then grew to tackle other issues affecting the poor.

    Arise now operates from an approximately $200,000 budget with a full-time director, six part-time workers and many volunteers. The group does not want to be a large, "slick" agency," Bewsee said.

    "We always want to be the kind of place that a poor person can walk in the door and feel at home," Bewsee said.

    When interviewed, more than a dozen workers and volunteers were crowded in the small Arise office, with visitors coming and going. Arise plans to move in December or January to a larger office with better parking on State Street at the former district office of retired state Rep. Ben Swan.

    When Arise started, Bewsee said it was unique to have such a grassroots group in Springfield. She is happy to have seen other grassroots groups join the fight over the years.

    A dinner celebrating the leadership of Bewsee is scheduled Nov. 11, from 6 to 10 p.m., at the Panache Ballroom, 827 State St. Entertainment will be provided by the Jo Sallins Band and Acoustic Dave.

    Tickets are $20 for lower income people and $40 for others and may be purchased at the Arise office, 467 State St., at Broadside Books, 247 Main St., Northampton, and at Amherst Books, 8 Main St., Amherst.

    Tickets may also be purchased by phone at 413-734-4948.


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    31 percent of likely voters were in favor of the measure, 59 percent were against and 9 percent were undecided.

    Public opinion appears to be turning against Question 1, according to a new poll on the hotly contested ballot question that would set mandatory patient limits for hospital nurses.

    In a Suffolk University/Boston Globe poll, 31 percent of likely voters surveyed were in favor of the measure, 59 percent were against and 9 percent were undecided. The results are a stark contrast image of the poll's results from Sept. 13-17, which found 52 percent in favor, 33 percent opposed and 15 percent undecided.

    A WBUR poll released on Sept. 25 found the race in a dead heat, with 44 percent in favor and 44 percent opposed.

    The proposal would set specific ratios for a range of clinical situations. Nurses caring for critical, non-stable patients in an emergency room would only be allowed one patient, while ER nurses caring for non-urgent patients could care for five patients. Nurses in maternity wards would be assigned one mother and her child immediately after birth, among other limits.

    The law would take effect on Jan. 1, and regulations would be written by the state Health Policy Commission, who could refer violations to the state Attorney General. Hospitals in violation could be fined up to $25,000 per day.

    The new poll found that a plurality of respondents -- 43 percent -- found their opinions most influenced by input from a nurse they knew. 8.6 percent were most influenced by the position of the Massachusetts Health & Hospital Association. 7.3 percent were influenced by the "Red Book," the official informational booklet distributed by the state.

    The position of unions and political advertisements were the most influential sources of information for 5.3 percent of respondents. No other reason crossed the 5 percent threshold.

    The question has been the focus of an intense and costly political struggle, with an opposing group funded largely by hospitals squaring off against the Massachusetts Nurses Association union.

    The Coalition to Protect Patient Safety, which is opposed to the question, has spent $17.5 million, flooding the airwaves with ads warning of dire financial consequences and cuts to services if the measure passes.

    The Committee to Ensure Safe Patient Care, which is union-funded and supports the question, has spent $10.4 million. Proponents of the measure say that lowering nurse-patient ratios leads to safer and better care, and describe the hospitals' predictions as empty scaremongering.

    MassLive has reached out to the Massachusetts Nurses Association and the Massachusetts Health and Hospital Association for comment.


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    The 2018 election could see record turnout among younger voters, with a new survey suggesting that as many as four in 10 are likely to cast ballots on Nov. 6 -- double the amount who showed up in recent midterms.

    The 2018 election could see record turnout among younger voters, with a new survey suggesting that as many as four in 10 are likely to cast ballots on Nov. 6 -- double the amount who showed up in recent midterms.

    The Institute of Politics at Harvard Kennedy School's 2018 Fall National Youth Poll found that 40 percent of voters aged 18 to 29 say they will "definitely vote" in the upcoming November election, compared to 37 percent in the Spring 2018 survey. 

    John Della Volpe, director of polling at the Institute of Politics, said the findings are "unlike anything" Harvard has seen in the years it has been conducting the biannual poll.

    "When we look back at the Census Population Survey and the analysis that members of our community have done, the youth vote typically is between 18 and 20 percent in terms of number of young people who turn out in midterm elections," he said in a call with reporters. "It's been as low as 16 percent, which it was in 2004, it's been as high as 21 percent in 1994 and 1986. We see every reason to believe through the Spring poll and this poll ... that this is likely to increase."

    Survey officials, however, offered that while youth voter turnout should see an increase, it is unlikely to be as high as indicated in the poll. 

    Teddy Landis, student chair of the Harvard Public Opinion Project, noted that while the poll projected 26 percent of voters aged 18 to 29 would vote in the 2014 midterms, just 16 percent turned out. 

    The poll similarly found 27 percent of young voters were likely to vote in the 2010 midterms, but just 20 percent cast ballots, officials said. 

    Despite that gap, they argued that the new poll's findings suggest "record turnout does seem possible."

    "We've been hearing a lot about the potential 'blue wave,' but it's not about a blue wave or 'red wave,' we're here to talk about a 'youth wave,'" Landis said. 

    Volpe offered that the projected increase is likely tied to younger voters' attitudes, which he argued are driven by "trauma and tragedy" from events like mass shootings and the great recession.

    "We're witnessing what I believe is a once-in-a-generation attitudinal shift about the efficacy of political engagement -- something similar to what we tracked before and after September 11th," he said. "The reason that more young people didn't participate in the late 90s and 2000s is because they didn't see a tangible difference that political engagement can make. We saw a 15-point shift in that attitude after September 11th. We saw a similar shift pre- and post- the 2016 campaign. That I think is kind of the underlying sense of the electorate, why they are beginning to pay much closer attention to candidates, as well as issues." 

    Although a majority of Democrats, 54 percent, and 43 percent of Republicans both indicated a high likelihood of voting in November, GOP voters saw a 7 percent increase in interest from the Spring survey, compared to just a 3 percent increase among Democrats. 

    Interest among independent voters remained unchanged at 24 percent from the Spring, the poll found. 

    The poll surveyed more than 2,000 Americans aged 18 to 29 from Oct. 3 to 17. It has a margin of error of plus or minus 3.2 percentage points, with a 95 percent confidence level.


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    The bridge will be closed on Wednesday and it will not reopen for 13 months.

    GREENFIELD - The state Department of Transportation announced that the Nash's Mill Road bridge will be shut down to all traffic, beginning Wednesday, as past of a $2.6 million bridge replacement project.

    The work is not expected to be completed before December of next year, officials said.

    The bridge, which connects Colrain Road with Leydon Street over the Deerfield River, was built in 1933.

    As part of construction, the bridge will be removed and a new one put in its place. The new bridge will be a single-span 105-foot steel beam bridge that will be wider and will include 10-foot lanes, and a 5-foot sidewalk on the southern side. 

    During construction, traffic will be detoured along Colrain Road, Colrain Street, Elm Street, Conway Street and Leydon Road.


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    Starting at 12 a.m. Tuesday and lasting into Wednesday police will enforce parking restrictions.

    Boston officials warn that any cars parked along the Red Sox World Series Victory Parade route will be towed.

    Ahead of the duck boat celebration through downtown, police will enforce parking restrictions. The details will be posted on each street, police said.

    Starting at 12 a.m. Tuesday and lasting into Wednesday police will enforce parking restrictions.

    Read the details below.

    Do not park on these streets Tuesday or Wednesday:

    • Lansdowne Street, from Brookline Avenue to Ipswich Street
    • Van Ness Street, from Ipswich Street to Kilmarnock Street
    • Jersey Street, from Boylston Street to Brookline Avenue
    • Ipswich Street, from Charlesgate East heading toward Fenway Park to Boylston Street

    Do not park on these streets on Wednesday:

    • Brookline Avenue, from Park Drive to Commonwealth Avenue
    • Dalton Street, from Belvidere Street to Boylston Street
    • Gloucester Street, from Newbury Street to Boylston Street
    • Boylston Street, from Park Drive to Ipswich Street, and from the Fenway to Tremont Street
    • Exeter Street, from Newbury Street to Boylston Street
    • Clarendon Street, from Newbury Street to Boylston Street
    • Berkeley Street, from St James Avenue to Boylston Street
    • Providence Street, from Arlington Street to Berkeley Street  
    • Arlington Street, from Newbury to Boylston Street
    • Charles Street South, from Park Plaza to Boylston Street
    • Tremont Street, from Boylston Street to Cambridge Street
    • West Street, from Washington Street to Tremont Street
    • Temple Place, from Washington Street to Tremont Street
    • Bromfield Street, from Washington Street to Tremont Street
    • Cambridge Street, from Tremont Street to Blossom Street
    • Beacon Street, from Somerset Street to Tremont Street
    • New Sudbury Street, from Cambridge Street to Congress Street
    • Congress Street, from New Sudbury Street to State Street
    • State Street, from Congress Street to Court Street
    • New Chardon Street, from Cambridge Street to Merrimac Street
    • Staniford Street, from Cambridge Street to Merrimac Street
    • Plympton Street, from Albany Street to Harrison Avenue
    • East Dedham Street, from Harrison Avenue to Albany Street
    • Columbus Avenue, from Melnea Cass Boulevard to Douglas Park

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    The Fall River city clerk's office confirmed that the 10 petitioners working to recall the 26-year-old mayor had their affidavit for a recall election certified on Monday.

    The group looking to recall Fall River Mayor Jasiel Correia II as he faces federal wire fraud and tax evasion charges now has until Nov. 19 to collect more than 2,500 certified signatures.

    The Fall River city clerk's office confirmed that the 10 petitioners working to recall the 26-year-old mayor had an affidavit for a recall election certified on Monday.

    The next step for the group: Collecting signatures of 5 percent of the city's registered voters.

    The clerk's office said the city has 50,207 registered voters, which means the group needs to collect 2,510 certified signatures.

    Signatures need to be submitted within 20 days, but since day 20 lands on Saturday, Nov. 17, the group has until Monday, Nov. 19.

    In one request for a recall, city resident Dawn Saurette wrote that Correia is "tainted by federal indictments that cannot be ignored."

    "By virtue of these indictments there is and should be a degree of distrust, no reasonable person would do business with the office of the mayor or the city of Fall River," she wrote.

    The Herald News reports that if all the needed certified signatures are collected, the city clerk will then send information to the City Council. The council would then request Correia step down from his position as mayor, the newspaper reports.

    If Correia declines to step down within five days, the council can then schedule a recall election. The council has 65 days to schedule the recall, the Herald News reports.

    Correia could run in the recall election.

    Authorities arrested Correia at a home in Bridgewater on Oct. 11. He has pleaded not guilty to 13 counts of wire and tax fraud.

    The charges are in connection to his app called SnoOwl. Investigators claim he collected money from investors but used the money on designer clothes, a Mercedes, and "adult entertainment" instead of investing in the venture.

    Correia has claimed his innocence and at one point said, "I will not resign."


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