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    A driver was ordered held on $10,000 bail Wednesday on charges of sexually assaulting a female passenger in his vehicle.

    A driver was ordered held on $10,000 bail Wednesday on charges of sexually assaulting a female passenger in his vehicle. 

    Prosecutors say Michael J. Squadrito, a 40-year-old man living in Everett, was driving for Uber when he picked up a fare outside a Boston karaoke bar early Tuesday. The woman had been drinking, celebrating her birthday, the Boston Globe reports. 

    The driver took her to a location in Dorchester he sexually assaulted her in the vehicle, Boston police said in a statement released Wednesday. 

    A plea of not guilty was entered on Squadrito's behalf, who alleges the encounter was consensual. 

    The woman told police otherwise. "The officer observed that [the] victim's eyes were red and puffy and had tears welled up in them as she spoke," the Globe reports, citing court documents. "The victim stated repeatedly that she wanted to wash her mouth out and do whatever necessary to get the suspect 'out of her body' immediately."

    Uber issued a statement after Squadrito's arrest, saying, "The driver's access to the app has been removed and we will continue to cooperate with law enforcement." 

    The company added that their "thoughts are with the rider during this difficult time."

    Thousands of drivers were rejected last year after failing background checks, including drivers with inactive licenses, arrests for operating under the influence and sex crimes. 

     


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    He opened fire on a crowd at a country dance bar holding a weekly "college night" Wednesday night.

    A law enforcement official says authorities have identified gunman and the weapon he used to kill a dozen people and himself at bar in California.

    The official told The Associated Press the man was 29 years old and deployed a smoke device and used a .45-caliber handgun when he opened fire inside the Borderline Bar & Grill late Wednesday in Thousand Oaks, north of Los Angeles.

    The official declined to provide any other details, speaking on condition of anonymity for lack of authorization to publicly discuss the investigation.

    Authorities and witnesses say the gunman wore dark clothing and didn't say anything as he fired inside the bar. Hundreds of people fled, some breaking windows and jumping out of second-floor windows to escape.

    He opened fire on a crowd at a country dance bar holding a weekly "college night" Wednesday night. The mass shooting killed 12 people and sent hundreds fleeing in terror. The gunman was later found dead at the scene.

    Law enforcement said the dead from the shooting included 11 people inside the bar and a sheriff's sergeant who was the first officer inside the door. 

     

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    Improper disposal of smoking materials was the cause of the blaze, a spokeswoman for the state Fire Marshal's office said.

     

    AMHERST - A woman was taken to a Boston hospital early Thursday after a fire broke out at Ann Whalen Apartments on Kellogg Street.

    The cause of the fire at the four-story apartment building was improper disposal of smoking materials, Jennifer Mieth, spokeswoman for the state Fire Marshal's office, said.

    The blaze  at the Amherst Housing Authority property, located at 33 Kellogg St., was reported about 3:40 a.m. Information on the nature of the woman's injuries was not available.

    WWLP reported evacuated residents have been taken to the Bangs Community Center which is behind the complex.

    This is a developing story. Additional information will be posted as soon as it is available.


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    University of Massachusetts police are investigating the appearance of flyers and stickers from an organization, which is listed as a white nationalist hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center that were found posted on campus property.

    AMHERST - University of Massachusetts police are investigating the appearance of flyers and stickers from an organization, which is listed as a white nationalist hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center, that were found posted on campus property Wednesday. 

    "The university denounces these acts of hate and intimidation," UMass said in a statement. "University of Massachusetts Police were notified and are investigating the matter. UMass Amherst is dedicated to the values of diversity, inclusion and equity, and it rejects anything associated with white nationalism.

    "This hateful organization is known for undertaking such provocative actions on college campuses across the country."

    The group, "Identity Evropa," is said to be aiming to recruit college-aged men on college campuses across the United States. The appearance of their materials on campus this week wasn't the first time they have been seen at UMass Amherst. 

    In 2017, "Identify Evropa" stickers and materials were found on campus, and the group bragged online about distributing its materials at colleges and universities across Western Mass. 


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    Students, faculty and local residents participated in a campus walkout at the University of Massachusetts on Wednesday to denounce the rise of white supremacy and "right-wing terror" around the country and this was just about the time students started finding racist flyers and posters on campus.

    AMHERST -- Racist posters and stickers were found Wednesday on the University of Massachusetts campus around the same time students, faculty and local residents were holding a rally against white supremacy and "right-wing terror."

    According to the Daily Collegian, the rally at noon Wednesday drew about 50 was hosted by the newly-formed UMass Students United Against Fascism, along with several members of the International Socialist Organization.

    "The importance of calling for this walkout and this rally today is to bring together the broad left on our campus, and to show solidarity for those students who've been targeted and for those workers who've been targeted because of their race, because of their religion, because they are from somewhere else," said International Socialist Organization member Stacey Sexton, according to the Collegian.

    The Collegian identified the group leaving the stickers and posters as "Identity Evropa," a white nationalist group that recruits college-aged men.

    The group is identified as a white supremacist organization by the Anti-Defamation League, and is designated by the Southern Poverty Law Center as a hate group.

    The Southern Poverty Law Center says that the group, founded in 2016, is "at the forefront of the racist 'alt-right's' effort to recruit white, college-aged men and transform them into the fashionable new face of white nationalism." 

    "Rather than denigrating people of color, the campus-based organization focuses on raising white racial consciousness, building community based on shared racial identity and intellectualizing white supremacist ideology," the organization's entry on the group reads.

    UMass police are investigating the appearance of the flyers and stickers. 

    UMass officials sent a statement to the campus denouncing "these acts of hate and intimidation. 

    "University of Massachusetts Police were notified and are investigating the matter. UMass Amherst is dedicated to the values of diversity, inclusion and equity, and it rejects anything associated with white nationalism," the statement said. "This hateful organization is known for undertaking such provocative actions on college campuses across the country."

    Earlier this month, police removed a sign at Melville Hall after receiving a report about graffiti that some believed was an etching of a Confederate flag. 

     Police removed the sign immediately but "concluded that the marred sign did not distinctly resemble a confederate flag," according to the email sent Dean of Students Cara Appel-Silbaugh

     But the African Student Association believed the etching was a confederate flag.

    "This is not an incident. This is not a misunderstanding. This is not just vandalism. This is hate," the post read. 

    In September, someone left a racial slur on a mirror in a single-stall bathroom, also in Melville Hall, a dorm for first-year students. That incident is still under investigation, spokeswoman Mary Dettloff wrote in an email.


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    The numbers represent, Rafael Devers, Andrew Benintendi, Jackie Bradley Jr., Rick Porcello and World Series MVP Steve Pearce.

    A Massachusetts man playing the Mass Cash lottery game won $100,000 by using the jersey numbers of World Series champion Boston Red Sox players on his ticket. 

    Jim Aylward Jr. of Templeton won the grand prize in the Massachusetts State Lottery game by using the jersey numbers of five Red Sox players, according to the Massachusetts Lottery.

    "Aylward's winning combination of 11-16-19-22-25 represents the numbers of two young stars, a dazzling outfielder, a starting pitcher and the series MVP," the lottery wrote in a news release.

    The numbers represent players Rafael Devers, Andrew Benintendi, Jackie Bradley Jr., Rick Porcello and World Series MVP Steve Pearce.

    The numbers matched the Monday drawing.

    Aylward, who has five children, nine grandchildren and four great-grandchildren, claimed his prize Wednesday.

    He bought the winning at Cumberland Farms in East Templeton. 


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    The campus of Greenfield Community College went into lockdown late Thursday morning.

    The campus of Greenfield Community College went into lockdown late Thursday morning. 

    The college notified the college community of status and said police are on campus. By early afternoon, the lockdown was lifted. All classes for the day have been canceled. 


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    Joan Gravel, director of marketing and communications at the college, said the problem occurred before the start of classes on Thursday morning. The college put out an alert to members of the campus community shortly before 7:30 a.m.

    SPRINGFIELD -- Springfield Technical Community College, closed all morning due to an electrical infrastructure issue, was set to reopen at noon.

    Joan Gravel, director of marketing and communications at the college, said the problem occurred before the start of classes. The college put out an alert to members of the campus community shortly before 7:30 a.m.

    Gravel had no additional information on the nature of the problem.

    Springfield Technical Community College, closed all morning due to electrical issue, reopens at noon.


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    Lt. Thomas Ryan, spokesman for Massachusetts Police, said he believes the lockdown was prompted by a telephone threat. State police were notified of the threat at approximately 11:30 a.m.

     

    GREENFIELD - A lockdown that went into effect at Greenfield Community College Thursday morning, apparently based on a telephone threat, has been lifted, officials said.

    The college tweeted about 12:30 p.m. that the lockdown has been lifted, however, classes have been cancelled for the rest of the day.

    Lt. Thomas Ryan, spokesman for Massachusetts Police, said he believes the lockdown was prompted by a telephone threat. State police were notified of the threat at approximately 11:30 a.m.

    Greenfield Community College, on its website, reported that the Brattleboro Police Department notified it Public Safety Office of a potential threat to the One College Drive campus.

    Here's the notice in its entirety:

    "At 11:21am today, GCC Public Safety was notified by the Brattleboro Police Department of a potential threat to the One College Drive campus. Out of an abundance of caution, Public Safety issued an emergency alert to students and staff to shelter in place until further notice. In consultation with state and local police, the lockdown has since been lifted. However, all classes are cancelled and all buildings in Greenfield are closed. We thank GCC Public Safety, the Greenfield Police Department and Massachusetts State Police for their rapid response."

    Greenfield police could not immediately be reached for comment.


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    Steve Wynn, the former casino magnate whose namesake company is under investigation by the Massachusetts Gaming Commission, has filed suit against the Gaming Commission in an attempt to prevent the release of the findings of the its investigation into him and the company he founded.

    Steve Wynn, the former casino magnate whose namesake company is under investigation by the Massachusetts Gaming Commission, has filed suit against the Gaming Commission in an attempt to prevent the release of the findings of the its investigation into him and the company he founded.

    Gaming Commission Executive Director Edward Bedrosian told the commission Thursday that Wynn filed the suit in Las Vegas late Wednesday and that the commission has retained outside counsel to review the suit and litigate it in Nevada.

    "Steve Wynn filed a lawsuit in Nevada against the director of the Investigations and Enforcement Bureau, the commission and Wynn Resorts. This new lawsuit, among other things, seeks to prevent the release of the investigation and enforcement bureau's investigatory report," Bedrosian said. "We were not surprised by this development, in fact, we had already retained local counsel in Nevada to help us litigate these issues as quickly as possible so we don't delay finishing the report and then having an appropriate adjudicatory hearing."

    Commissioners will not be given a copy of the Investigations and Enforcement Bureau's report on Wynn and Wynn Resorts until the suit is resolved, Bedrosian said.

    "You will not be able to see the report until these issues are resolved," he said in response to a question from Commissioner Enrique Zuniga. "We need to resolve these issues to make sure the report that is given the commission is the report you will use in the adjudicatory hearing."

    Steve Wynn's lawyer: Gaming Commission chair Stephen Crosby defamed casino mogul with 'predator' comment

    Late last month, Bedrosian said the investigation that began in January was almost complete and that he expected the findings of the investigation would be made public at the start of a public hearing on the topic sometime in early December.

    Since January, the commission has been looking into sexual misconduct allegations against the former Wynn Resorts president and CEO and the handling of those allegations by Wynn Resorts. A January 2018 Wall Street Journal story detailing an alleged "decades-long pattern of sexual misconduct" by the casino mogul, including claims he had pressured employees to perform sex acts, sparked the commission's inquiry.

    Karen Wells, head of the commission's investigations bureau, told the commission earlier this year that she confirmed that Steve Wynn had paid a private $7.5 million settlement to a manicurist to resolve a sexual harassment allegation and that the payment was not previously disclosed during the licensing process.


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    The store has a pharmacy, bakery, deli, florist, coffee station and small dining area, and has expanded kosher deli and butcher foods. Watch video

    LONGMEADOW -- Big Y Foods Inc. on Thursday celebrated a grand reopening of its store at 802 Williams St. with a cake cutting and donations to schools in town.

    "It was a long time coming," said Big Y President and chief operating officer Charles L. D'Amour.

    Construction began in April following months of regulatory approvals. Big Y kept the store open during construction.

    "It's not easy to stay open during construction," D'Amour said. "We'd like to thank our customers and the staff for making it work. We feel our responsibility to stay open. We're the central market for the town. We have a pharmacy here."

    D'Amour pointed out the new LED lighting and energy-efficient refrigerator and freezer cases.

    The store was built out to about 23,000 square feet of selling space from 20,000 and totals 29,000 square feet including basement-level storage. Larger Big Y stores, like the Wilbraham location, have 55,000 square feet of total space, and the average is in the 40s, said Vice President of Corporate Communications Claire D'Amour-Daley.

    The Longmeadow store has all the amenities, though, including a pharmacy, bakery, deli, florist, coffee station and small dining area.

    "We've gotten better at squeezing and moving things so we can fit them together," she said.

    She said the Longmeadow store has expanded kosher deli and butcher foods.

    The store has 147 employees. It's open from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m., Monday to Saturday, and 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Sundays.

    D'Amour said Big Y is building and stocking stores now with a focus on fresh and locally grown or locally produced products and ready-to-eat or prepared meals.

    "That's what our customers expect. They expect to come into one of our stores and find food in all stages of preparation," he said.

    That includes ingredients, ready-to-eat entrees and sides and the new Ready. Chef. Go! meals where Big Y puts its proteins and other ingredients in a bag that can be microwaved, baked or grilled at home for an easy meal.

    The Longmeadow location was built in 1961 as part of another supermarket chain. Big Y took it over in 1972. The most recent renovation before this one was in 2011.

    Big Y once shared the building with other retailers. It delayed renovations to allow Alex's Bagel Shop time to move to a new Route 5 location. Brightwood Hardware, which also once shared the building, was sold to Pittsfield's Carr Hardware and moved to a new building just south of the state line at 481 Enfield St., Enfield, Connecticut.

    Today, Big Y shares the location only with a Big Y Express gas station and convenience store across the parking lot from the supermarket.

    Springfield-based Big Y operates 80 locations throughout Massachusetts and Connecticut including 70 supermarkets, 39 pharmacies, Fresh Acres Market, Table & Vine Fine Wines and Liquors and 8 Big Y Express gas and convenience locations with over 11,000 employees.

    Expansion plans include a new from-the-ground-up store in Marlborough, Connecticut, that Big Y hopes to open soon. In 2019, Massachusetts law will allow Big Y to take on two new liquor licenses under rules for how many liquor licenses can be held under the same ownership. Charles D'Amour said the company is still considering where it will use those new licenses.

    Brothers Paul and Gerald D'Amour, Charles and Claire's uncle and father, founded the store in 1936 and named it after an intersection in Chicopee where two roads converge to form a "Y."


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    Weather was the main cause of the delay in completing filtration of Westfield's Well 2 says DPW director

    WESTFIELD - Well 2 should be up and running next week, according to Department of Public Works Director David Billips, who said recent inclement weather had delayed work to bring a filtration system online.

    "(It's) behind because of the weather," said Billips. "We are awaiting final test results, but there was an equipment issue at the contract lab. The system should be online next week."

    Well 2 was taken offline in March when it was discovered it had higher than acceptable levels of contaminants. The source of the contamination is firefighting foam containing fluorinated surfacants PFOS and PFOA used at Barnes Air National Guard Base, according to city officials.

    The city is suing three manufacturers of the foam and has filed a tort claim with the U.S. Department of Defense.

    Temporary filtration of Well 2 began in late spring and had been set for completion in August. Several delays pushed off testing, which Billips said is now complete.

    In addition, permanent filtration of Wells 7 and 8, which were taken offline due to contamination in late 2015, is underway.

    "The new treatment plant for wells 7 & 8 is under construction and is expected to start producing water late spring or early summer next year," Billips said.

    The projects were funded by a $13 million bond that also included a new water tank on East Mountain Road and interconnection to the Springfield Water Works.
    Billips said the Well 2 project is "close to budget and we will monitor that moving forward."

    Well 1 is currently the main water supply for the north side of Westfield.


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    Mercy Medical Centers Spirit of Women network will be hosting Sparkle! Springfield in order to promote health and wellness for women.

    SPRINGFIELD -- Mercy Medical Center's Spirit of Women network, which provides educational opportunities for women to learn about their health, is gearing up to present "Sparkle! Springfield" on Wednesday night.

    "At Mercy Medical Center, we strive to be a valuable health resource to our community," said Mark Fulco, president of Mercy Medical Center and its affiliates.  "Sparkle! is the premiere event for Mercy's Spirit of Women network, where the emphasis is on women and their personal health and wellness."

    Sparkle! Springfield, which takes place Wednesday, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m., at Chez Josef in Agawam, include dozens of Mercy Medical Center physicians and service providers, as well as community partners and vendors.

    The program will also have interactive sessions which include complimentary chair massages, energy therapy, and an art project. 

    "Sparkle! is a time for women to invest in themselves and their health, network, de-stress, enjoy and focus on what matters most to them," Fulco said.

    The event includes food, desserts, tote bag with goodies and door prizes.

    Physicians will speak one-on-one with guests during "Dessert with the Docs."

    Admission is $15. Pre-registration and pre-payment is required.

    For more information or to register for this event, visit www.mercycares.com or call 877-783-7262.


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    Ceridwyn Carlton said her class sat terrified in the dark for an hour waiting to learn what was happening on campus.

    No one told Ceridwyn Carlton why the campus was in lockdown.

    Was it a drill? Was it not a drill?

    Sitting in a classroom with the lights turned off with her instructor and classmates, Carlton, a student at Greenfield Community College could only imagine the worst.

    "I texted my family and friends," she said. "I told them I didn't know what was happening, I didn't know what was happening, and I told them that I loved them."


    Greenfield Community College was locked down briefly on Thursday after a phone call was made to Brattleboro, Vermont, police at 11:21 a.m. that threatened violence on campus.

    According to a statement by campus police, the lockdown was made "out of an abundance of caution."

    State police said they were notified of the emergency at around 11:30 a.m. Classes were cancelled, no one was allowed to enter the campus, and no one on campus was allowed to leave.

    The lockdown was lifted roughly an hour later, but classes remained cancelled for the day.

    While the emergency was short lived and was ultimately a false alarm. Carlton, some 40 minutes, later said she was still shaken up by the ordeal.

    The word she used to describe how she felt was "traumatized."

    "I know that even in a small town, you're not 100 percent safe," she said. "But this is definitely giving me a lot more anxiety."

    She also said she was angry about how the college handled the situation and how she and her students were literally left in the dark.

    In the event of emergencies on campus, students are supposed to get a text alert that describes what is happening and for people to take action. The course instructor is also supposed to get an email relaying the same information.

    "None of that happened," she said.

    According to the college website, Greenfield Community College uses an emergency alert system that is supposed to notify all students, faculty and staff of emergencies. Alerts are sent by phone, text and emails. Alerts are sent "during actual emergencies such as,but not limited to, dangerous weather approaching, bomb threats and suspicious packages, and incidents that threaten the safety of the community."

    The campus statement notes that campus Public Safety issued an emergency alert for everyone to shelter in place until further notice.

    Carlton said she never received any alert, and neither did anyone else in the class.

    Carlton said the class first learned of it when someone entered the classroom and talked briefly to the instructor. The instructor then turned off the lights, closed the door and had everyone assemble quietly in the front of the room, like they were supposed to do.

    "No one knew what was going on," she said.

    Everyone was under the impression that it was some kind of a drill because they could hear talking in the classroom lecture next door, and people were still walking up and down the halls.

    She said it wasn't until she texted her mother about what was happening and her mother called Greenfield police.

    "My mom texted me back and said 'It's not a drill."

    She showed the text to the instructor and the class. After that things got serious really quickly.

    While they sat quietly in the dark, they could still hear the lecture next door.

    After about an hour, they heard the next class adjourn and begin to file out of the classroom.

    Her instructor went into the hallway to ask, and when he came back he said the lockdown was over and everyone could leave.

    There was still no text alert notification from Public Safety that the lockdown was over, she said.

    "They didn't know we were in there," she said. If the instructor hadn't gone to investigate, there's a chance they would still be sitting there in the dark, she said.

    "It's (expletive deleted) how they dealt with it," she said.

    "I felt everyone should have gotten the message. The fact that they didn't is ridiculous."


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    Roughly 20 people had gathered outside Carlson's residence

    Self-described Antifa protestors chanted insults outside the Washington D.C. home of Fox News personality Tucker Carlson on Wednesday evening and publicized his address on social media.

    Roughly 20 people protested outside Carlson's residence, said Lt. Jon Pongratz of the D.C. police. Authorities received a call at about 6:30 p.m. and responded "within a few minutes," Pongratz told The Washington Post.

    Smash Racism D.C., which describes itself an "anti-fascist," or Antifa, group, claimed responsibility for the protest on social media. It has previously targeted U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen, and other conservatives.

    In since deleted videos uploaded to Twitter by the group on Wednesday, and reported on CNN, participants were heard saying "Tucker Carlson, we will fight! We know where you sleep at night!" They called him a "racist scumbag" and hurled epithets.

    The Twitter account shared Carlson's address, which is a violation of Twitter rules, and it has since been suspended.

    There were no arrests but police confiscated several signs, according to a police report obtained by The Associated Press.  It lists the incident as a "suspected hate crime" on the basis of "anti-political" bias.

    Neither Carlson nor his four children were home at the time, but his wife, Susie, was there alone, according to Fox News. Carlson said his wife locked herself into a pantry and called police.

    "Here's the problem, I have four children," he told Fox News. "I never thought twice about leaving them home alone, but this is the reaction because this group doesn't like my TV show."


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    Over 40 different communities across Massachusetts are holding rallies to protest the replacement of Rod Rosenstein in the Russia investigation.

    Liberal activists have planned rallies in over 40 different communities across Massachusetts to protest President Trump's recent decision to replace Rod Rosenstein as head of the Russia investigation. 

    In a controversial move, Trump fired Attorney General Jeff Sessions Wednesday, replacing him with acting AG Matthew Whitaker. As a result, Whitaker is expected to replace deputy AG Rosenstein as the head of the investigation into Russia's meddling in U.S. elections. 

    Critics of Rosenstein's dismissal have suggested it is a way for the President to subvert investigation into potential collusion between the Trump campaign and Russian agents during the 2016 campaign. 

    Activists paint his replacement, Whitaker, as "a partisan loyalist who has publicly stated his hatred for Mueller" and has called the investigation a "witch hunt," as one activist group in Northampton put it.

    Whitaker previously served in the U.S. Justice Department during the George W. Bush administration. Before his recent appointment Whitaker called for a limiting of the scope of the Russia probe, even writing an op-ed for CNN that argued the investigation was "going too far."  

    Now a coalition of progressive political organizations have organized the "Nobody is Above the Law" rallies -- a mass political action designed to protest Trump's recent decision.    

    The groups in the coalition include left organizations Indivisible, Common Cause, the Women's March, and Moveon.org. Moveon.org, a political action committee that left organizers typically use to promote activism, is spreading the word about the protests through its website. 

    Protests have been planned across the Commonwealth, including a number of Western Massachusetts communities like Springfield, Belchertown, Northampton, Amherst, and Greenfield.

    The point of the protests is to ensure that "Whitaker immediately commit not to assume supervision of the investigation," or recuse himself from it, as former AG Sessions did. However, the Washington Post has reported that Whitaker "has no intention of recusing himself." 

    The coalition of groups said Thursday that the President had compromised the investigation by replacing Rosenstein:  

    Donald Trump has installed a crony to oversee the special counsel's Trump-Russia investigation, crossing a red line set to protect the investigation. By replacing Rod Rosenstein with just-named Acting Attorney General Matt Whitaker as special counsel Robert Mueller's boss on the investigation, Trump has undercut the independence of the investigation. 

    Similarly, organizers for a Northampton rally scheduled for Saturday called Trump's recent move a "constitutional crisis for our country."

    "It demands an immediate and unequivocal response to show that we will not tolerate abuse of power from Donald Trump," the group said. "This is our moment to stand up to protect our democracy. Let's mobilize to show that we won't let Donald Trump become the authoritarian that he aspires to be." 

    The Russia investigation was formed in May of 2017 after U.S. intelligence agencies released a report suggesting that Russia had meddled in the 2016 U.S. Presidential election. The investigation includes a probe of possible collusion between the Trump campaign and foreign powers, such as Russia. 

    Rosenstein's tenure with the investigation came with some amount of controversy, including a New York Times report that suggested he considered taping conversations between himself and Trump, as well as invoking the 25th amendment to remove the President from office. Rosenstein denied the allegations.  

    For a complete list of the rallies and protests in Massachusetts, readers can visit Moveon.org


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    Raymond Corbeil, a 48-year-old Springfield resident, is facing a count of enticing sex from a child under the age of 16.

    A facilities worker for Springfield's public schools has been accused of soliciting sex from a minor.

    Raymond Corbeil, a 48-year-old Springfield resident, is facing a count of enticing sex from a child under the age of 16. He was charged following a report from the concerned parents of an East Longmeadow 11-year-old boy that led police to discover explicit conversations with Corbeil on the boy's cell phone, according to a criminal complaint.

    Two other men -- 19-year-old Nathaniel Paulo of Longmeadow and 67-year-old Springfield resident Kenneth Gullotti -- were also charged in connection with the investigation. Paulo is facing nine counts of distributing obscene matter to a minor and Gullotti is facing two counts of kidnapping of a child and two counts of enticing sex from a child under 16.

    On Oct. 10, East Longmeadow Police Det. Michael Ingalls met with the parents of the boy, who told Ingalls they had discovered two gay social network applications on their son's phone.

    "Upon looking through their son's profile on the application Hornet it was found he was in multiple conversations with adult males, some sharing pornographic photos of themselves with the young 11-year-old male and also enticing him for sex," Ingalls wrote in his statement of facts. "It appears that in some of the conversations, the 11-year-old male portrays himself as someone older in the beginnings of the conversations, but in three chats the victim tells the adult males he is chatting with an age under 16 at which time they continue talking with him."

    One of those chats was with a man using the Hornet profile name Ray. Investigators allege that profile belonged to Corbeil.

    "It should be noted that Mr. Corbeil is an employee of the City of Springfield where he serves as a janitor for various city schools and is around under age children on a daily basis," Ingalls wrote.

    Azell Cavaan, Chief Communications Officer for Springfield Public Schools, confirmed that Corbeil is a facilities tradesman for the district and is on leave pending investigation.

    In the chats, the victim initially portrayed himself as an older man interested in having oral sex, according to the police report. But his story changed, police said; at one point the victim identified himself as a 13-year-old, before claiming he was in fact the father of the 13-year-old-boy.

    Corbeil allegedly expressed interest in giving oral sex to the 13-year-old, prompting Ingalls to visit Corbeil's home. Corbeil accompanied Ingalls to the police station, where he told police he believed he was speaking to a man who was of age, according to Ingalls' report.

    Detectives then read him a message in which he allegedly attempted to set up a meeting to have oral sex with a person identified as a 13-year-old boy, Ingalls wrote.

    "He stated that he did send that message but didn't meet the victim," Ingalls wrote.

    Michael Kollack, Corbeil's attorney, declined to comment when reached by MassLive.

    Corbeil was released without bail, but on a series of conditions - including no contact with the victim, no unsupervised contact with anyone under 18, and no use of social media or dating apps.

    On Tuesday, the Springfield Public Schools Office of Safety and Security requested a copy of Corbeil's docket sheet and release conditions from Palmer District Court.


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    Warren, D-Massachusetts, said Thursday that she is still taking a hard look at running for president in 2020, but she does not have a firm timeline for making a decision. Watch video

    U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Massachusetts, said Thursday that she is still taking a "hard look" at running for president in 2020, but she does not have a firm timeline for making a decision. 

    Warren said in September that she will take a look at a potential presidential run after the midterm elections.

    On Thursday, asked about her thought process at a Boston press conference, Warren said, "It's been less than 48 hours. I said I'd take a hard look, and I will."

    "I don't have a timeline," Warren said, adding that it is "too early." 

    Warren said until now, "I was pretty darn focused on the midterm."

    Asked whether she is concerned about the impact of the controversy over her Native American heritage, Warren said simply, "No," then took another question. 


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    Larry Green, 25, of Springfield, pleaded guilty to two counts of armed assault with intent to murder and other charges for a shooting in June 2017.

    SPRINGFIELD -- A man driving on Bay Street tried to avoid gunfire, but when he looked down, "his arm was just dangling in his lap with blood," a prosecutor said.

    A car with four young people going to prom was hit next, although no bullets hit the occupants. When their car began to emit smoke they thought it was going to explode, and they were helped out of it by passers-by.

    Those victims stayed in the Hampden district attorney's office Thursday as Larry Green, the shooter, pleaded guilty in Hampden Superior Court. Assistant District Attorney Max Bennett said they didn't want to have Green see them.

    "Everyone is afraid of him," Bennett said.

    He said the victims were prepared to testify against Green if he didn't plead guilty, which he said was very brave on their part.

    Green, 25, of Springfield, pleaded guilty to two counts of armed assault with intent to murder, two counts of malicious damage to a motor vehicle and one count of carrying a firearm without a license (subsequent offense). Judge David Ricciardone sentenced Green to 10 to 15 years in state prison.

    One of the counts of armed assault with intent to murder named as victim the man who had his arm shattered by one of Green's bullets. 

    The second count lists "John Doe" as the victim. Green was shooting at a car going the opposite direction of the two cars his bullets hit. The occupant or occupants of that car have not been identified, Bennett said.

    Defense lawyer Daniel R. Bergin said Green, who had gotten out of prison nine days before in another gun case, knew the person in the car he was targeting and thought he was in danger, so he fired off shots. Bergin said no one from that car went to a hospital with gunshot wounds, so he believes Green did not hit anyone in that vehicle.

    Bergin wanted Ricciardone to sentence Green to five to seven years in state prison.

    Bennett asked for a sentence of 13 to 15 years.

    Something Green told police in a previous arrest followed Green on Thursday, as Bennett said it was one reason for the sentence he was recommending.

    When he was arrested in April 2015 in a case involving firearms offenses, he told police he would rather "sit in a 4 by 8" cell for the rest of his life for illegal guns than be killed. He said he had to carry a firearm in part because people think he killed someone.

    Green had been held for several years while awaiting trial on a murder charge related to the fatal shooting of 19-year-old Dwayne Kelly on Oct. 26, 2012.

    In the document ending the murder case against Green, the prosecutor said new information had come to light that impacted the prosecution's ability to meet its burden of proof beyond a reasonable doubt.

    In the present case, Bennett said Green fired the shots at 6:51 p.m. on June 1, 2017, from the corner of Brown and Bay streets. He said there are several businesses there and many people were driving on Bay Street or walking around.

    Seven 9 mm shell casings were found at the scene.

    A surveillance camera at a nearby store captured the shooting, Bennett said. Green had gone into a store to get food, and was still holding the food in his left hand when he fired the shots with his right hand.

    He said Green is "an extremely prominent member of the Sycamore Street posse." Green's Hampden County Correctional Center record is filled with gang activity in the jail, he said.

    Bennett read a victim impact statement from the man whose arm was shattered by a bullet from Green's gun.

    "I fear I will have pain in my arm for the rest of my life," the man said. He said he has had two surgeries and is waiting for another. He said he has post-traumatic stress disorder.

    It has taken him more than a year to get back to work. There is nerve damage in his arm, his statement said.

    Bennett said, "He did no more than go out to do some errands."

    As for the three girls and one boy in the car on the way to the prom, they said there was pandemonium as they tried to figure out what had happened, Bennett said.

    "These girls didn't deserve to get shot at as they were going to the prom," Bennett said.

    "All the city of Springfield is a victim here. People live on Bay Street. ... They deserve to live in a neighborhood where bullets are not flying," he said.

    Ricciardone told Green he was giving him the 10- to 15-year sentence as an incentive to conduct himself in prison in a way that might make parole a possibility before 15 years.


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    A police department spokesman said detectives showed great restraint Thursday afternoon while dealing with a gun-wielding suspect following an armed robbery.

    SPRINGFIELD -- A police department spokesman said detectives showed great restraint Thursday afternoon while dealing with a gun-wielding suspect following an armed robbery.

    The incident began about 1:30 p.m. when police responded to an alert from the ShotSpotter gunfire detection system on Grand Street, spokesman Ryan Walsh said.

    Detectives Matthew Longo and Eric Podgurski were on their way to Grand Street when they saw a man, later identified as Kieson Cuffee, running in the area of White Street and Orange Street with a heavy object in his pants.

    When Cuffee saw the detectives, he entered a store on Orange Street. Longo and Podgurski entered the store, immediately announced their presence and asked the suspect to show his hands, Walsh said.

    Cuffee then reached toward his side and after a brief struggle pulled a firearm from under his clothing and begin to raise it, Walsh said. Another struggle ensued and Cuffee fled the store on foot. Detectives gave chase and caught Cuffee on Pasadena Street.

    Cuffee was handcuffed and placed in an ambulance for treatment of injuries he suffered during the chase and struggle. In the ambulance he forced his weight on a paramedic and attempted to escape, Walsh said.

    He was taken to the ground by officers and suffered a laceration to his forehead while struggling. Cuffee was then taken to Mercy Medical Center in a police cruiser to receive treatment.

    Officers located Cuffee's firearm in the store. It was was cocked and loaded. The ammunition in Cuffee's firearm matched what was located on Grand Street.

    The initial incident on Grand Street involved an assault on an adult female who was attacked by two men and two women, Walsh said. Cuffee pointed a firearm at the victim and stole her phone, Walsh said.

    Two women involved in the assault, Tyanna Dancy and Joyce Ingraam, were also arrested, Walsh said.

    Cuffee, 27, of Clifton Avenue, faces numerous charges including two counts carrying a firearm without a license, three counts of assault with a dangerous weapon, armed robbery and discharging a firearm within 500 feet of a building.

    Ingram, 26, of Wrentham Road, was charged with assault and battery with a dangerous weapon, assault and battery with severe bodily injury and a default warrant.

    Dancy, of Grand Street, was charged with assault and battery with a dangerous weapon and assault and battery with serious bodily injury.


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