{* *}
Attn! Always use a VPN when RSSing!
Your IP adress is . Country:
Your ISP blocks content and issues fines based on your location. Hide your IP address with a VPN!
Bonus: No download restrictions, fines or annoying ads with any VPN Purchased!
Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Channel Catalog


    0 0

    The body of the 44-year-old guitarist for the Springfield metal band was found in a pond near his Stafford Springs, Conn., home on Oct. 17.

    WORCESTER -- The public memorial event scheduled to honor late All That Remains guitarist Oli Herbert on Sunday has been cancelled.

    A posting on Herbert's official Facebook page alerted fans that the event at the Worcester Palladium has been called off, though no additional details were given for the cancellation. 

    The body of the 44-year-old guitarist for the Springfield metal band was found in a pond near his Stafford Springs, Conn., home on Oct. 17 after he was reported missing.  Foul play was not suspected.

    The cause of death has not been disclosed.

    Meanwhile, All That Remain singer Phil Labonte revealed in an interview on Friday with Loudwire that Jason Richardson would be filling in as lead guitarist for the band's upcoming tour.

    "We've got Jason Richardson, who played with Chelsea Grin and Born of Osiris and he's going to be filling in and that's the dude that Oli would've wanted. We toured with Born of Osiris for I think two tours. Oli was always talking about Jason as like that kid is the best guitar player I've ever seen," Labonte said. "As soon as we decided that we'd talked about carrying on, once we decided we were going to, we locked in someone to fill in for this tour we've got coming up and then we're going to look for a permanent replacement."

    Herbert began playing guitar at 14. His first paid gig was a Battle of the Bands on his final day of his senior year at Longmeadow High School. 

    He made a name for himself in Western Massachusetts clubs with Netherworld, a thrash metal band he formed in 1991.

    Herbert co-founded All That Remains with Labonte in 1998.

    The band played Springfield clubs, like Fat Cat and Mars Nightclub, before being signed to Prosthetic Records, a division of Metal Blade, back in 2002.

    All That Remains released its ninth studio album, Victim of the New Disease on Friday.


    0 0

    Southern Californians like Arik Fultz battered by the wildfires got to take a breath Saturday and take store of what the wildfires did to them. A lull in fierce winds that drove a pair of destructive fires allowed firefighters to make their first real progress in stopping the blazes.

    MALIBU, Calif. -- Just a day ago, Arik Fultz was feeding the horses on his 40-acre ranch near Malibu.

    Now, after wildfires roared through parts of Southern California, there's nothing left of his ranch but charred remains. His family and his 52 horses survived. But two houses, two barns, three trailers and decades of accumulated possessions are gone.

    "It just doesn't feel real that it's all gone," he said.

    Southern Californians like Fultz battered by the wildfires got to take a breath Saturday and take store of what the wildfires did to them. A lull in fierce winds that drove a pair of destructive fires allowed firefighters to make their first real progress in stopping the blazes.

    But a sustained stretch of vicious winds, and the strong possibility of a new round of troubles, were set to start Sunday.

    Two people were found dead amid the larger of the two fires, Los Angeles County sheriff's Chief John Benedict said Saturday.

    The severely burned bodies were discovered in a long residential driveway on a stretch of Mulholland Highway in Malibu, where most of the surrounding structures had burned.

    Benedict did not have any details about the identities of the dead. He said detectives were investigating.

    The deaths came as authorities in Northern California announced the death toll from a massive wildfire there has reached 23 people, bringing the statewide total to 25.

    Southern California's fire had destroyed at least 150 homes, from Malibu mansions to modest dwellings in inland canyon communities.

    No growth was reported Saturday on the larger of the two fires, which had torched 109 square miles (282 square kilometers). Firefighters now have the blaze 5 percent contained. Los Angeles County Fire Chief Daryl Osby said.

    Progress also came against the smaller fire, prompting Ventura County officials to allow people in a handful of communities to return to their homes.

    Hundreds of thousands across the region remain under evacuation orders, and could stay that way for days as winds pick up again.

    Fire burned in famously ritzy coastal spots like Malibu, where Lady Gaga, Kim Kardashian West, Guillermo del Toro and Martin Sheen were among those forced out of their homes amid a citywide evacuation order.

    "It was way too big a firestorm," said Lani Netter, whose Malibu home was spared while her neighbor's burned. "We had tremendous, demonic winds is the only way I can put it."

    The flames also stretched into the suburb of Thousand Oaks, a city of 130,000 people that just a few days ago saw 12 people killed in a mass shooting at a country music bar.

    Wildfire raged on both sides of the city still in mourning, where about three-quarters of the population are under evacuation orders that officials urged them to heed.

    "We've had a lot of tragedy in our community," said Ventura County Supervisor Linda Parks, whose district includes Thousand Oaks. "We don't want any more. We do not want any more lives lost."

    At the Fultz ranch near Malibu, all of the 52 horses survived after a wild scramble to save them.

    Fultz's mother, 61-year-old Tricia Fultz, said everyone expected the fire to stay well south of their property, but shifting winds forced them to take the horses out to open pastures as quickly as they could.

    Three were still in their pens when the adjacent barn caught fire, and Tricia Fultz just had to open the pens, burning her hands and hoping for the best.

    She, her husband and six others rode out the fire in a tunnel a short distance up the road as the fire burned the hillsides above and all around them.

    "It's so surreal because it's so dark, and when we're in the tunnel you can't see anything," Tricia Fultz said. "There was so much burning and so much black."

    The fire hopscotched around the Oak Park neighborhood of 70-year-old Bill Bengston, leaving most houses untouched.

    The home for 22 years of Bengston and his wife, Ramona, was the only house on his block that burned. And it burned everything.

    "It's all gone," he said softly as he sifted through the remains. "It's all gone."

    The hardest to lose were the photos and the mementos handed down through the family -- a cigar box that belonged to his great-grandfather; the handcuffs his father carried in World War II.

    "We're somewhat devastated," Bengston said. "Still a little bit numb."

    --By Jonathan J. Cooper and Andrew Dalton


    0 0

    A Massachusetts couple reclaimed their wedding day after they discovered their first minister wasn't licensed in Massachusetts and was facing larceny charges.

    With two words, a Massachusetts couple reclaimed their wedding day.

    "I do," Ashley and David Mellen said during an intimate second wedding at the Ocean House Restaurant in Dennis Port Saturday.

    In mid-September, the Agawam couple were at the Red Jacket Inn in South Yarmouth. She was in her dress. He was in his tuxedo.

    The magical day transformed into a nightmare situation for the couple whose love blossomed after meeting on an online dating website.

    They learned their minister, a man who was named officiant of the year in a Rhode Island magazine, was never licensed to marry people in Massachusetts.

    That man, James Stern, is also accused of stealing the credit card information from some of Ashley's bridesmaids.

    The couple's wedding license expired and was never filed by Stern.

    Already facing theft charges in Rhode Island, Stern now faces charges in Cape Cod in connection with his alleged actions at the Mellen wedding.

    "It is a little weight off my shoulders now," Ashley said after the couple's second ceremony. "It feels nice to feel like it is official. I can now officially call him my husband."

    David, with a smile on his face, said the couple made sure the second minister was licensed in Massachusetts. 

    The minister, Rev. Dr. Elizabeth Zielinski of Creative Weddings in Ludlow, loudly stated she was licensed in Massachusetts during the ceremony. She conducted the ceremony for free.

    "We put the past behind us and are going to start fresh," Ashley said. "Having some of our close friends and family here, it is a nice way to start off the official marriage."

    Getting married near the water was something the couple wanted to do, and they were certain to make that happen again.

    "This is where our hearts are, the Cape. Getting married near the water is something that we had wanted to do," she said. 

    The couple, and their friends and family, joked about the situation. 

    "Round two," David said before the ceremony. 

    After the couple's first ceremony, they learned Stern never submitted the marriage license. They learned he wasn't licensed to marry anyone in Massachusetts. 

    Ashley then learned Stern was facing credit card theft charges in Rhode Island after his involvement in another wedding. He is also accused of stealing gift cards and identifications from YMCAs in Rhode Island. 

    Authorities say Stern stole the credit card information for two of Ashley's bridesmaids. He allegedly got into the bridal suite during the first ceremony and stole the information. 

    Yarmouth police obtained arrest warrants for Stern on charges of larceny of $1,200 by false pretense and impersonating a public official. 

    "During the ceremony, her bridal party had been provided with a locked room to store their belongings. Later that same evening, several bridesmaids reported the misuse of their credit cards," Yarmouth police said.

    Stern remains in custody in Rhode Island. He has 51 entries on his criminal record in Massachusetts for similar crimes such as identity fraud, fraudulent use of a credit card, and related larceny charges dating back to June 1994. He is also wanted for burglary in New Jersey. 

    Ashley and David are ready to move on from the situation, but are keeping watch on the status of Stern's criminal cases. 

    "Dave, I never expected to be renewing our vows so soon, but they remain true to this day and will for many years to come," Ashley told her husband. 

    "I promise you that I will always be there for you in every way possible," David said as the sun began to set Saturday. "I promise to be there for you even on your toughest nights and to provide comfort whenever you need me."

    The minister, as soon as the ceremony was over, assured the couple the marriage license would be submitted on time. 


    0 0

    Tickets are available for an "Irish Country Christmas" concert and show scheduled Dec. 16, at Pope Francis Preparatory School Theater, featuring singer/songwriter Deirdre Reilly.

    SPRINGFIELD -- Tickets are available for an "Irish Country Christmas" concert and show scheduled Dec. 16, at the Pope Francis Preparatory School Theater, starring singer/songwriter Deirdre Reilly.

    The musical event will benefit the 1916 Garden of Remembrance at Forest Park.

    The show is described as a "unique blend off toe-tapping songs and Celtic tunes of Ireland, traditional country favorites, world-class Irish dancers, and a delightful selection of some of the great, classic songs of the holiday season."

    The event begins 3 p.m., at Pope Francis, located at 99 Wendover Road. There is general admission seating.

    Tickets are $25 per person. To purchase tickets, call 413-787-7770. Checks should be made payable to "SCCCA -- An Irish Country Christmas."

    The Garden of Remembrance commemorates the 1916 Irish Easter Rising, the first major uprising to end British rule.


    0 0

    The person was arrested on a suspicious of operating under the influence. The trooper was taken to a nearby hospital with minor injuries, WCVB reports.

     

    This story has been updated 

    Massachusetts State Police arrested a person who rear-ended a trooper's SUV during a traffic stop in Andover early Sunday, WCVB reports.

    Early Sunday morning the trooper pulled over a white Toyota SUV on Interstate 93 at the ramp for Interstate 495. The SUV then slammed into the back of the state police vehicle, the television station reports.

    The person was arrested on the suspicion of operating under the influence. The trooper was taken to a nearby hospital with minor injuries, WCVB reports.


    0 0

    The shooting happened in the area of Eastern Avenue and Greene Street.

    SPRINGFIELD - One person was injured in a shooting early Sunday morning in the Old Hill section of the city.

    The shooting happened at about 4:25 a.m. near the intersection of Eastern Avenue and Green Street, said Ryan Walsh, police spokesman.

    Police found the victim near 200 Eastern Ave. Walsh did not say how they were alerted to the shooting.

    The victim is expected to recover from the gunshot wound, Walsh said.

    The crime is under investigation by police detectives, Walsh said.

    This is a breaking story. MassLive will update if more information becomes available.


    0 0

    As Trump, Putin and dozens of other heads of state listened in silence, French President Macron used the occasion to sound a powerful and sobering warning about the fragility of peace and the dangers of nationalism.

    PARIS (AP) -- World leaders with the power to make war but a duty to preserve peace solemnly marked the end of World War I's slaughter 100 years ago at commemorations Sunday that drove home the message "never again" but also exposed the globe's new political fault lines.

    As Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin and dozens of other heads of state and government listened in silence, French President Emmanuel Macron used the occasion, as its host, to sound a powerful and sobering warning about the fragility of peace and the dangers of nationalism and of nations that put themselves first, above the collective good.

    "The old demons are rising again, ready to complete their task of chaos and of death," Macron said.

    "Patriotism is the exact opposite of nationalism. Nationalism is a betrayal of patriotism," he said. "In saying 'Our interests first, whatever happens to the others,' you erase the most precious thing a nation can have, that which makes it live, that which causes it to be great and that which is most important: Its moral values."

    Trump, ostensibly the main target of Macron's message, sat stony-faced. The American president has proudly declared himself a nationalist.

    As well as spelling out the horrific costs of conflict to those with arsenals capable of waging a World War III, the ceremony also served up a joyful reminder of the intense sweetness of peace, when high school students read from letters that soldiers and civilians wrote 100 years ago when guns finally fell silent on the Western Front.

    Brought alive again by people too young to have known global war themselves, the ghostly voices seemed collectively to say: Please, do not make our mistakes.

    "I only hope the soldiers who died for this cause are looking down upon the world today," American soldier Capt. Charles S. Normington wrote on Nov. 11, 1918, in one of the letters. "The whole world owes this moment of real joy to the heroes who are not here to help enjoy it."

    The Paris weather -- gray and damp -- seemed aptly fitting when remembering a war fought in mud and relentless horror.

    The commemorations started late, overshooting the centenary of the exact moment when, 100 years earlier at 11 a.m., an eerie silence replaced the thunder of war on the front lines. Macron recalled that 1 billion shells fell on France alone from 1914-1918 .

    As bells marking the armistice hour rang across Paris and in many nations ravaged by the four years of carnage, Macron and other leaders were still on their way to the centennial site at the Arc de Triomphe.

    Under a sea of black umbrellas, a line of leaders led by Macron and his wife, Brigitte, marched in a stony silence on the cobbles of the Champs-Elysees, after dismounting from their buses.

    Trump arrived separately, in a motorcade that drove past three topless protesters with anti-war slogans on their chests who somehow got through the rows of security and were quickly bundled away by police. The Femen group claimed responsibility. French authorities said the three women faced charges of sexual exhibitionism. White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders cited security protocols for the presidential motorcade's solo trip down the grand flag-lined avenue, which was closed to traffic.

    Last to arrive was the Russian president, Putin, who shook Trump's hand and flashed him a thumbs-up. German Chancellor Angela Merkel was positioned in pride of place between Trump and Macron, an eloquent symbol of victors and vanquished now standing together, shoulder to shoulder. Overhead, fighter jets ripped through the sky, trailing red, white and blue smoke in homage to the French flag.

    The geographical spread of the more than 60 heads of state and government who attended, silent and reflective, showed how the "war to end all wars" left few corners of the earth untouched but which, little more than two decades later, was followed so quickly and catastrophically by the even deadlier World War II.

    On the other side of the globe, Australia and New Zealand held ceremonies to recall how the war killed and wounded soldiers and civilians in unprecedented numbers and in gruesome new, mechanized ways.

    Those countries lost tens of thousands of soldiers far away in Europe and, most memorably in the 1915 battle of Gallipoli, in Turkey. In central London, Britain's Queen Elizabeth II, clad in black, watched from a balcony as her son Prince Charles laid a wreath on her behalf at the foot of the Cenotaph memorial that honors the fallen. Britain had 880,000 military dead in the war.

    In Paris, the jewel that Germany sought to capture in 1914 but which the Allies fought successfully to defend, the armistice commemorations were being followed by the afternoon opening of a peace forum pushed by Macron.

    Trump will be the most notable absentee at the forum, where Macron's defense of multilateralism will take center stage. Trump lives by an "America First" credo, and plans to visit the American cemetery at Suresnes on the outskirts of Paris before heading home.

    On Saturday, he was criticized for canceling a visit to the Belleau Wood battleground northeast of Paris because of rain.

    Remembered for brutal trench warfare and the first use of chemical weapons, the conflict pitted the armies of France, the British empire, Russia and the U.S. against a German-led coalition that included the Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman empires. Almost 10 million soldiers died, sometimes tens of thousands on a single day.

    The U.S. came late to the war, in April 1917, but over 11/2 years it became a key player and tipped the scales for the allies. At the war's end, the U.S. had 2 million troops in Europe and another 2 million ready to cross the Atlantic if needed, a force that turned the United States into a major military power.

    Even though Germany was at the heart of provoking two world wars over the past century, the nation has become a beacon of European and international cooperation since.

    With so many leaders in Paris, the commemoration also provoked a flurry of diplomacy on the sidelines, with conflict in Yemen and Syria among the hot-button issues.

    On Sunday, Merkel met with the head of the United Nations, an organization born from the ashes of World War II, and the president of Serbia. It was a Serb teenager, Gavrilo Princip, who assassinated the Austro-Hungarian crown prince in Sarajevo in 1914 to set off events which led to the outbreak of war.

    By JOHN LEICESTER, RAF CASERT and LORI HINNANT, Associated Press. AP writers Angela Charlton, Sylvie Corbet, Elaine Ganley and Thomas Adamson contributed to this report.


    0 0

    A state police trooper had just arrested a woman for drunken driving, when another man rear-ended him, Sgt. Paul Sullivan said.

    A 54-year-old Lowell man faces drunken driving charges after he allegedly rear-ended a state trooper who was parked on the side of the highway in Andover with another woman he had just arrested in the backseat.

    State police said Edison Martinez, who was driving a white Toyota SUV while under the influence, slammed into the back of a state police vehicle at about 3:10 a.m. on Interstate 93 at the ramp for Interstate 495. This is his third operating under the influence offense, Massachusetts State Police Sgt. Paul Sullivan said.

    The trooper had just stopped and arrested 33-year-old Medina Pires for driving under the influence, Sullivan said, and the Methuen woman was sitting in the back of the state police SUV at the time of the crash. 

    They were waiting for a tow truck. 

    Both the trooper, who is not being identified, and Pires were taken to the hospital for minor injuries and released to the Andover barracks.

    Martinez faces several charges including operating under the influence as a third offense, reckless operation of a motor vehicle and driving with a suspended license, Sullivan said.


    0 0

    Authorities called in a mobile DNA lab and anthropologists to help identify the dead as the search went on for victims of the most destructive wildfire in California history.

    PARADISE, Calif. (AP) -- Authorities called in a mobile DNA lab and anthropologists to help identify the dead as the search went on for victims of the most destructive wildfire in California history. The overall death toll from the outbreak of fires at both ends of the state stood at 25 Sunday and appeared likely to rise.

    The worst of the blazes was in Northern California, where flames reduced the town of Paradise, population 27,000, to a smoking ruin days ago and continued to rage in surrounding communities. The number of people killed in that fire alone, at least 23, made it the third-deadliest on record in the state.

    Butte County Sheriff Kory Honea said the county was bringing in more rescue workers and consulted anthropologists from California State University at Chico because in some cases "the only remains we are able to find are bones or bone fragments."

    "This weighs heavy on all of us," Honea said.

    Authorities were also bringing in a DNA lab and encouraged people with missing relatives to submit samples to aid in identifying the dead.

    The sheriff's department compiled a list of 110 people unaccounted for, but officials held out hope that many were safe but had no cellphones or some other way to contact loved ones.

    Firefighters gained modest ground overnight against the blaze, which grew slightly to 170 square miles (440 square kilometers) from the day before and was 25 percent contained, up from 20 percent, said David Clark, a spokesman for the state fire agency, Cal Fire.

    Clark said Sunday that high winds and dry conditions were expected over the next 24 hours: "We're at a pivotal point now."

    The blaze destroyed more than 6,700 buildings, nearly all of them homes.

    Two people were also found dead in a wildfire in Southern California, where flames tore through Malibu mansions and homes in working-class Los Angeles suburbs. The severely burned bodies were discovered in a long residential driveway in Malibu, home to a multitude of Hollywood celebrities.

    Among those forced out of their homes were Lady Gaga, Kim Kardashian West, Guillermo del Toro and Martin Sheen.

    Flames also raged on both sides of Thousand Oaks, the Southern California city still in mourning over the massacre of 12 people in a shooting rampage at a country music bar Wednesday night.

    Cal Fire Battalion Chief Lucas Spelman said the larger of the region's two fires, the one in Malibu, grew to 130 square miles (337 square kilometers) and was 10 percent contained, but firefighters braced for another round of Santa Ana winds, the dry gusts that blow out of the interior toward the coast.

    The count of lost structures in both Southern California fires climbed to at least 179, authorities said.

    All told, a quarter-million people were under evacuation orders across the state, officials said.

    Drought, warmer weather attributed to climate change and home construction deeper into forests have led to more destructive wildfire seasons in California that have been starting earlier and lasting longer.

    California emerged from a five-year drought last year but has had a very dry 2018. Much of the northern two-thirds of the state is abnormally dry.

    In Paradise, a town founded in the 1800s, residents who stayed behind to try to save their properties or who managed to return despite an evacuation order found incinerated cars and homes.

    Wearing masks because the air was still heavy with smoke, people sidestepped metal that had melted off of cars or Jet-Skis as they surveyed their ravaged neighborhoods. Some cried when they saw nothing was left.

    Jan McGregor, 81, got back to his small two-bedroom home in Paradise with the help of his firefighter grandson. He found his home leveled -- a large metal safe and pipes from his septic system the only recognizable traces. The safe was punctured with bullet holes from guns inside that went off in the scorching heat.

    He lived in Paradise for nearly 80 years, moving there in 1939, when the town had just 3,000 people and was nicknamed Poverty Ridge.

    "We knew Paradise was a prime target for forest fire over the years," he said. "We've had 'em come right up to the city limits -- oh, yeah -- but nothing like this."

    McGregor said he probably would not rebuild: "I have nothing here to go back to."

    By GILLIAN FLACCUS, DON THOMPSON and PAUL ELIAS,  Associated Press.  Daisy Nguyen, Olga R. Rodriguez, Sudhin Thanawala and Darlene Superville contributed to this report. 


    0 0

    In 1918, on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month, fighting ceased in World War I.


    0 0

    The driver and a second passenger were both taken to the hospital, but authorities have not identified the extent of their injuries, according to NBC Boston.

     

    A 20-year-old woman is dead after the car she was riding in crashed into a home in Holbrook early Sunday morning, NBC Boston reports.  

    Nicole Ricci, of Stoughton, was one of three people in the car, which was traveling on Route 139 around 5 a.m. when it crossed over a lane and hit a utility pole. The car crashed through a fence and landed in a home on Kingsley Street, NBC Boston reports. 

    Ricci was taken to a nearby hospital where she was pronounced dead.

    The driver and a second passenger were both taken to the hospital, but authorities have not identified the extent of their injuries, according to the television station. 

    Michelle Carter lives in the home with her sister and daughter, she told NBC Boston, but no one was home at the time of the crash. 


    0 0

    Aerosmith guitarist Joe Perry remained in the hospital Sunday after performing with Billy Joel at New York's Madison Square Garden Saturday night.

    Aerosmith guitarist Joe Perry remained in a New York hospital Sunday after collapsing following a performance with Billy Joel at Madison Square Garden Saturday night.

    Perry, 68, had just finished a guest spot performing "Walk This Way" with Joel, went back to his dressing room and collapsed, according to TMZ. Paramedics worked on Perry for approximately 40 minutes in his dressing room before rushing him to the hospital. Joel was still onstage and unaware of Perry's condition.

    Perry's camp issued a statement on Sunday to Variety:

    "Following a guest performance during Billy Joel's show last night at Madison Square Garden, experienced shortness of breath and was treated backstage by paramedics who gave the guitarist oxygen and used a tracheal tube to clear his airway before taking him to a hospital. This morning Perry remains in the hospital where he is alert and responsive. The Aerosmith guitarist will be unable to appear today at Rock And Roll Fantasy Camp in Florida and apologizes to those attending.  Perry is expected to return to the road later this month."

    In July 2016, Perry collapsed on stage during a performance with the Hollywood Vampires in Brooklyn.


    0 0

    Todd Crevier was named Springfield Veterans Day parade marshal while Police Officer Jose L. Feliciano was named Veteran of the year.

    SPRINGFIELD - After marching through the streets of the city, Veterans Day Parade Marshal Todd Crevier asked the crowd assembled on the City Hall steps to repeat after him.

    "22," he said. "Louder: 22," he repeated, receiving a more enthusiastic response.

    "That is a rather tragic number," he said. Crevier explained an average of 22 veterans every day - more than 8,000 a year - commit suicide because they can no longer live with the physical or psychological burdens of war.

    Crevier, a disabled veteran who served two combat tours with the U.S. Army, was selected as this year's marshal in part for his efforts to help his fellow veterans. He founded New England Adventures which offers all-expense paid outdoor sporting and outdoor activities to veterans who are suffering.

    He thanked the crowd for coming to support veterans and reminded people some need help throughout the year.

    This year's Veterans Parade began at Springfield Technical College, traveled down State and Main Streets and ended at City Hall. Dozens of units participated including a wide number of veterans' groups such as the Winchester Square Vietnam Era Veterans and the Disabled American veterans; Junior ROTC units from four city high schools, the Springfield Kiltie band and the Melha Shrine marching units.

    Multiple other communities including Chicopee, Westfield and Northampton also held events on Veterans Day. Holyoke commemorated the day on Saturday at Holyoke High School and the ceremony included a Massachusetts National Guard helicopter crew landing in the adjacent field.

    Springfield Police Officer Jose L. Feliciano, who served in the U.S. Army and then the Army National Guard for 27 years, was named as the 2018 Veteran of the Year. A police officer since 1995, Feliciano was praised for his service to the city, including the many volunteer hours he commits.

    "I want to thank all the veterans who have served, who are currently serving and especially those who are currently deployed," he said.

    Danielle Witherspoon and Emmanuel Owusu, employees for the city's Veteran Services Department, handed out flags to people waiting for the parade to make its way down Main Street. While the audience was thin on State Street, people crowded the sidewalks on Main Street, they said.

    The department this year ordered 25,000 flags to place of veterans' graves in the city. They had extras so decided to hand them out so parade-goers could show their appreciation to the veterans marching, Witherspoon said.

    Mayor Domenic J. Sarno thanked the many marchers and participants and told them "Springfield remembers its veterans."

    He and others placed a memorial wreath on a monument in Court Square. A trumpeter then played taps and the Springfield Kiltie Band played "Amazing Grace."

    Sarno reminded people Sunday is the 100th Veterans Day celebrated by the country and talked a little about the history of the day. It was originally called Armistice Day to honor the ceasing of hostilities for World War I. In 1954 it was changed to Veterans Day to honor all U.S. veterans.

    "It is because of their efforts we are able to live the lives we live and we are forever grateful," he said.


    0 0

    Wayne Hairston, 56, was last seen at the Basketball Hall of Fame where he was attending a church service.

    SPRINGFIELD - Family members of a man last seen at a church service on Oct. 21 are asking people for to help locate him.

    Family members of Wayne Hairston have put up posters in store windows in the city asking people to help find him. His sister said "in anguish" while waiting any information about him.

    Hairston, 56, was last seen at the Basketball Hall of Fame where he attended a church service, family members said.

    Police said he is about 5 feet, one inch tall, weighs about 260 pounds and wears glasses. He usually stays at the Springfield Rescue Mission.

    Anyone who has seen Hairston or has information about his whereabouts is asked to contact the police department's non-emergency at 413-787-6302 or to share tips or other information call 413-750-2253, said Ryan Walsh, police spokesman.


    0 0

    Read obituaries from The Republican newspaper in Springfield, Massachusetts.

     

    Here are the obituaries published this weekend in The Republican:

    Obituaries from The Republican, Nov. 10-11, 2018


    0 0

    His widow revealed that a planned memorial service in Worcester on Sunday was canceled because of threats made against her family.

    Oli Herbert, guitarist for the Springfield rock band All That Remains, drowned in a pond near Stafford Springs, Conn., home on Oct. 17 after ingesting antidepressants and a sleep aid, his wife revealed.

    In a statement on Herbert's Facebook page, his wife, Beth, also revealed that a planned memorial service in Worcester on Sunday was canceled because of threats made against the family.

    Beth Herbert stated, in part:

    "Oli was apparently self-treating for manic-depression that has run in his family for several generations. Anti-depressants were found in his system, as well as a sleep aid. The psych meds found in his system were the same ones that a close relative has been prescribed for a long time, so he knew what to hunt down for the "treatment". Seeing how he was not going (and WOULDN'T GO) to a doctor to get diagnosed with the issue and was not being prescribed the medications and monitored on them, it explains his occasional erratic behavior here at home."

    She urged anyone with information on who provided her late husband with psychiatric medication to contact the Connecticut State Police, Troop C in Tolland, Conn.

    Herbert began playing guitar at 14. His first paid gig was a Battle of the Bands on his final day of his senior year at Longmeadow High School. 

    He made a name for himself in Western Massachusetts clubs with Netherworld, a thrash metal band he formed in 1991.

    Herbert co-founded All That Remains with Phil Labonte in 1998.

    The band played Springfield clubs, like Fat Cat and Mars Nightclub, before being signed to Prosthetic Records, a division of Metal Blade, back in 2002.

    All That Remains released its ninth studio album, Victim of the New Disease on Friday.

    Labonte revealed in an interview on Friday with Loudwire that Jason Richardson of Chelsea Grin and Born of Osiris would be filling in as lead guitarist for the band's upcoming tour.